femoral triangle

(redirected from trigonum femoris)

triangle

 [tri´ang-g'l]
a three-cornered object, figure, or area, such as a delineated area on the surface of the body; called also trigone.
carotid triangle, inferior that between the median line of the neck in front, the sternocleidomastoid muscle, and the anterior belly of the omohyoid muscle.
carotid triangle, superior carotid trigone.
cephalic triangle one on the anteroposterior plane of the skull, between lines from the occiput to the forehead and to the chin, and from the chin to the forehead.
digastric triangle submandibular triangle.
Einthoven's triangle an imaginary equilateral triangle with the heart at its center, formed by the axes of the three bipolar limb leads.
Einthoven's triangle. Bipolar limb leads I, II, and III form Einthoven's triangle. Other standard positions for electrocardiographic leads are the augmented unipolar leads: aVR (right arm), aVL (left arm), and aVF (left leg). From Polaski and Tatro, 1996.
triangle of elbow a triangular area on the front of the elbow, bounded by the brachioradial muscle on the outside and the round pronator muscle inside, with the base toward the humerus.
triangle of election superior carotid triangle.
facial triangle a triangular area whose points are the basion and the alveolar and nasal points.
femoral triangle the area formed superiorly by the inguinal ligament, laterally by the sartorius muscle, and medially by the adductor longus muscle; called also Scarpa's triangle.
infraclavicular triangle that formed by the clavicle above, the upper border of the greater pectoral muscle on the inside, and the anterior border of the deltoid muscle on the outside.
inguinal triangle the triangular area bounded by the inner edge of the sartorius muscle, the inguinal ligament, and the outer edge of the long adductor muscle.
lumbocostoabdominal triangle that lying between the external oblique muscle of the abdomen, the posterior inferior serratus muscle, the erector muscle of the spine, and the internal oblique muscle of the abdomen.
occipital triangle the area bounded by the sternocleidomastoid muscle in front, the trapezius muscle behind, and the omohyoid muscle below.
Scarpa's triangle femoral triangle.
subclavian triangle a triangular area bounded by the clavicle, the sternocleidomastoid muscle, and the omohyoid muscle.
suboccipital triangle that lying between the posterior greater rectus muscle of the head and the superior and inferior oblique muscles of the head.

fem·o·ral tri·an·gle

[TA]
a triangular space at the upper part of the thigh, bounded by the sartorius and adductor longus muscles and the inguinal ligament, with a floor formed laterally by the iliopsoas muscle and medially by the pectineus muscle; the branches of the femoral nerve are distributed within the femoral triangle; it is bisected by the femoral vessels, which enter the adductor canal at the triangles apex.

femoral triangle

a wedge-shaped depression formed by the muscles in the upper thigh at the junction between the anterior abdominal wall and the lower limb through which the femoral nerve, artery, and vein and lymphatic vessels pass.

fem·o·ral tri·an·gle

(fem'ŏr-ăl trī'ang-gĕl) [TA]
A triangular space at the upper part of the thigh, bounded by the sartorius and adductor longus muscles and the inguinal ligament, with a floor formed laterally by the iliopsoas muscle and medially by the pectineus muscle; the branches of the femoral nerve are distributed within the femoral triangle; it is bisected by the femoral vessels, which enter the adductor canal at its apex.
Synonym(s): trigonum femorale [TA] , Scarpa triangle.

Scarpa,

Antonio, Italian anatomist, orthopedist, and ophthalmologist, 1747-1832.
canals of Scarpa - separate canals for the nasopalatine nerves and vessels.
fossa scarpae major - Synonym(s): femoral triangle
Scarpa fascia - the deeper membranous or lamellar part of the subcutaneous tissue of the lower abdominal wall. Synonym(s): membranous layer of superficial fascia
Scarpa fluid - the fluid contained within the membranous labyrinth of the inner ear. Synonym(s): endolymph
Scarpa foramina - two openings in the line of the intermaxillary suture that transmit the nasopalatine nerve.
Scarpa ganglion - a collection of bipolar nerve cell bodies forming a swelling on the vestibular part of the eighth nerve in the internal acoustic meatus. Synonym(s): vestibular ganglion
Scarpa habenula - Synonym(s): Haller habenula
Scarpa hiatus - a semilunar opening at the apex of the cochlea through which the scala vestibuli and the scala tympani of the cochlea communicate with one another. Synonym(s): helicotrema
Scarpa liquor - the fluid contained within the membranous labyrinth of the inner ear. Synonym(s): endolymph
Scarpa membrane - closes the fenestra cochleae or rotunda. Synonym(s): secondary tympanic membrane
Scarpa method - cure of an aneurysm by ligation of the artery at some distance above the sac.
Scarpa sheath - one of the coverings of the spermatic cord, formed of delicate connective tissue and of muscular fibers derived from the internal oblique muscle. Synonym(s): cremasteric fascia
Scarpa staphyloma - bulging near the posterior pole of the eyeball due to degenerative changes in severe myopia. Synonym(s): posterior staphyloma
Scarpa triangle - branches of the femoral nerve are distributed within the femoral triangle. Synonym(s): femoral triangle; fossa scarpae major

femoral triangle

inverted triangular-shaped area at anterior aspect of upper thigh; bounded proximally by inguinal ligament, laterally by medial border of sartorius, medially by medial border of adductor longus; it contains (from superior to deep) skin and superficial fascia, lymphatic vessels and nodes, upper part of the great saphenous vein, femoral branch of genitofemoral nerve, branches of ilioinguinal nerve, femoral vessels and muscle tissue (adductor longus, pectineus, psoas major, iliacus)

triangle

a three-cornered object, figure or area, as such an area on the surface of the body capable of fairly precise definition. Called also trigone.

facial triangle
a triangular area whose points are the basion and the alveolar and nasal points.
femoral triangle
the triangle bounded cranially by the sartorius, caudally by the pectineus and deeply by the iliopsoas muscles in the dog. The pulse of the femoral artery can be taken at this site.
vesical triangle
the area of the bladder wall within the triangle demarcated by the ureteral and urethral orifices. The bladder mucosa is firmly attached at this point and does not form folds.
Viborg's triangle
a surgical site on the side of the throat of the horse bounded by the caudal border of the mandible, the linguofacial vein and the tendon of the sternocephalic muscle.
References in classic literature ?
The wind being adverse, the boat was again sent on shore on the following morning, and the same gentlemen again landed, but promised to come off at a moment's warning; they again forgot their promise in their eager pursuit of wild geese and seawolves.
Larks trilled unseen above the velvety green fields and the ice-covered stubble-land; peewits wailed over the low lands and marshes flooded by the pools; cranes and wild geese flew high across the sky uttering their spring calls.
When wild geese honk high of nights, and when women without sealskin coats grow kind to their husbands, and when Soapy moves uneasily on his bench in the park, you may know that winter is near at hand.
I heard of a man, once, who invaded the nesting grounds of wild geese," Maud said.
Large flocks of wild geese were seen passing over the country, which hovered, for a time, around the hidden sheet of water, apparently searching for a resting-place; and then, on finding them selves excluded by the chill covering, would soar away to the north, filling the air with discordant screams, as if venting their complaints at the tardy operations of Nature.
Not even rats in the wall, for they were starved out, or rather were never baited in -- only squirrels on the roof and under the floor, a whip-poor-will on the ridge-pole, a blue jay screaming beneath the window, a hare or woodchuck under the house, a screech owl or a cat owl behind it, a flock of wild geese or a laughing loon on the pond, and a fox to bark in the night.
In the valleys her and there might be seen a small flock of wild geese, an everywhere the ground was so soft that the snipe were abl to feed.
When wild geese in flight take the form of a letter V you say instinct.
Once, high in the air, looking for open water and ahead of the season, a wedged squadron of wild geese honked northwards.
It's a great place for the wild geese and the ducks.
The sun had altogether disappeared behind the pines and only the very highest of the little clouds were still pink; out at sea the mists were creeping up, and the sails of the fishing-smacks had turned a dull brown; a flight of wild geese passed across the disc of the moon with loud cacklings.