trigeminal nerve

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trigeminal

 [tri-jem´ĭ-nal]
triple.
pertaining to the fifth cranial nerve (trigeminal nerve).
trigeminal nerve the fifth cranial nerve; it arises in the pons, is composed of sensory and motor fibers, and has three divisions: ophthalmic, maxillary, and mandibular. (See anatomic Table of Nerves in the Appendices.) The ophthalmic division supplies sensory fibers to the skin of the upper eyelid, side of the nose, forehead, and anterior half of the scalp. The maxillary division carries sensory impulses from the mucous membranes of the nose, the skin of the cheek and side of the forehead, and the upper lip and upper teeth. The mandibular division carries sensory impulses from the side of the head, chin, mucous membrane of the mouth, lower teeth, and anterior two-thirds of the tongue. (This nerve is sometimes called the great sensory nerve of the head.) The motor fibers are part of the mandibular branch and supply several of the muscles of chewing. Neuralgia of this nerve is the condition known as tic douloureux.
Areas of innervation by each of the three branches of the trigeminal nerve.

trigeminal nerve

n.
Either of the fifth pair of cranial nerves, being the chief sensory nerve of the face and the motor nerve of the muscles of chewing and having sensory and motor functions in the teeth, mouth, and nasal cavity. Also called trigeminus.

trigeminal nerve

The 5th of the 12 pairs of cranial nerves and the sensory nerve of the face. Each trigeminal nerve divides into three main branches, the ophthalmic, the maxillary and the mandibular nerves, which then branch to supply the corresponding parts of the face.

trigeminal nerve

the fifth cranial nerve of vertebrates, usually possessing opthalmic, mandibular and maxillary branches.
References in periodicals archive ?
Microsurgical relationships of the superior cerebellarartery and trigeminal nerve. J Neurosurg 1978; 49: 669-78.
(34.) Cetkovic M, Antunovic V, Marinkovic S, Todorovic V, Vitosevic Z, Milisavljevic M.Vasculature and neurovascular relationships of the trigeminal nerve root.
Microvascular relations of the trigeminal nerve. J.
Being the largest cranial nerve trigeminal nerve can be visualized better with various modern imaging techniques (15).
It has been used as an adjunct for planning the management of trigeminal nerve pathologies (17).
Anatomy of trigeminal nerve to identify lesions in MRI
Intracranial tumors in the presence of aneurysms, angiomas, or vascular malformation are among other causes of TN [45,46] that may occur by either direct tumoral compression or the wrapping of the trigeminal nerve root [47, 48].
The hallmark of TN includes recurrent attacks of lancinating pain in the trigeminal nerve [50].
The brief paroxysms pain in TN is restricted to the facial conveyance of the trigeminal nerve and can be triggered by stimuli to sensory endings in the trigeminal receptive area [52].
(6) Taste sensation may be involved, but the corneal reflex and motor function of the trigeminal nerve are usually preserved.
Sarcoidosis that exclusively involves the trigeminal nerve is rare; most cases present as secondary involvement in patients with systemic sarcoidosis.
Continued activation of the trigeminal nerve by inflammatory changes in the dura and alteration in central pain processing may, over time, result in self-sustained firing of the central neurons, shifting the migraine from a peripheral pain process to a central pain process.

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