trientine hydrochloride

tri·en·tine hy·dro·chlor·ide

(trī'en-tēn hī'drō-klōr'īd),
A chelating agent used to remove excess copper from the body in Wilson disease.

trientine hydrochloride

[trī·en′tēn]
an oral medication for treatment of an inherited defect in copper metabolism (Wilson's disease).
indications It is prescribed for the relief of symptoms of Wilson's disease for people who cannot tolerate penicillamine.
contraindications Known hypersensitivity to this drug prohibits its use.
adverse effects The most serious side effects are possible iron deficiency and hypersensitivity reactions.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Trientine hydrochloride is used in the treatment of penicillamine-intolerant patients with Wilson's disease, a genetic disease that prevents the body from removing excess copper and potentially causing life-threatening organ damage.
Clinical experience with trientine hydrochloride is limited and alternate dosing regimens have not been well-characterized; all endpoints in determining an individual patient's dose have not been well defined.
Trientine hydrochloride and penicillamine cannot be considered interchangeable.
M2 PHARMA-April 5, 2017-Kadmon Submits Second US Abbreviated NDA Filing for Trientine Hydrochloride
KD034is the company's trientine hydrochloride formulation for the treatment of Wilson's disease, a rare genetic liver disorder, for patients who are intolerant of penicillamine.
The company also submitted an ANDA for a bottled form of trientine hydrochloride in December 2016.