trident

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tri·den·tate

(trī-den'tāt),
Three-toothed; three-pronged.
Synonym(s): trident
[tri- + L. dentatus, toothed]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

trident

adjective Having or referring to three prongs; tridentate.
 
noun A three-pronged instrument.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

tri·den·tate

(trī-den'tāt)
Three-toothed; three-pronged.
[tri- + L. dentatus, toothed]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The finished project will look great and will be a fantastic homage to the Trident and a wonderful preservation of a historic aircraft."
By 1966, Trident had developed 381 homes and was managing ten shops on nine estates - something the Group does to this day.
Through a series of mergers with smaller housing associations through the 1960s and early 1970s, Trident Housing Association emerged and began the journey to today's modern social business and group of social enterprises aided by the creation of the Housing Corporation and major public funding for housing for rent for the first time.
The plane, currently based at Durham Tees Valley Airport, is one of only 117 Trident jets ever made and the last of its class anywhere in the world.
A team of eight flying fanatics from across the UK have formed the Save The Trident group.
Tridents are far more difficult to locate than surface combatants, making them ideal for penetrating into the littoral and conducting low-risk initial strikes against enemy defenses ashore.
Tridents can be converted to stealth battleships at a cost of $500 million to $600 million each, whereas carriers cost nearly $5 billion each, excluding the cost of their air wing.
The eighteen submarines each carry 24 missiles, either the Trident I/C-4 or Trident II/D-5.
strategic nuclear force structure will be adjusted to fourteen Trident submarines, all carrying D-5 missiles.