tricuspid


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tricuspid

 [tri-kus´pid]
having three points or cusps, as a valve of the heart.

tri·cus·pid

, tricuspidaltricuspidate (trī-kŭs'pid, -kŭs'pi-dăl, -kŭs'pi-dāt),
1. anatomy having three points, prongs, or cusps, as the tricuspid valve of the heart.
2. dentistry having three tubercles or cusps, as the second upper molar tooth (occasionally) and the upper third molar (usually). Synonym(s): tritubercular

tricuspid

/tri·cus·pid/ (tri-kus´pid) having three points or cusps, as a valve of the heart.

tricuspid

(trī-kŭs′pĭd)
n.
An organ or part, especially a tooth, having three cusps.
adj. also tricuspidal (-pĭ-dəl) or tricuspidate (-pĭ-dāt′)
1. Having three cusps, especially a molar tooth.
2. Of or relating to the tricuspid valve.

tricuspid

[trīkus′pid]
Etymology: Gk, treis, three; L, cuspis, point
1 adj, pertaining to three points or cusps.
2 adj, pertaining to the tricuspid valve of the heart.
3 n, a tooth with three points or cusps, rare in humans. Also called tricuspal, trident, tridentate.

tri·cus·pid

, tricuspidal , tricuspidate (trī-kŭs'pid, -pi-dăl, -pi-dāt)
1. Having three points, prongs, or cusps, as the tricuspid valve of the heart.
2. Having three tubercles or cusps, as the second upper molar tooth (occasionally) and the upper third molar (usually).

tricuspid

1. Having three cusps or points, as on a molar tooth.
2. Pertaining to the three-cusped heart valve that separates the chambers on the right side.

tricuspid

  1. a tooth having three cusps.
  2. (of a valve) See HEART (section d).

tri·cus·pid

, tricuspidal , tricuspidate (trī-kŭs'pid, -pi-dăl, -pi-dāt)
1. In dentistry, having three tubercles or cusps, as second upper molar tooth (occasionally) and upper third molar (usually).
2. In anatomy, having three points, prongs, or cusps, as the tricuspid valve of the heart.

tricuspid

having three points or cusps, as a valve of the heart.

tricuspid dysplasia
a congenital defect of the tricuspid heart valve commonest in cats. There is a variety of forms of the defect which causes enlargement of the right atrium and ventricle. See also ebstein's anomaly.
tricuspid insufficiency
a functional incompetence that may be caused by rupture of the chordae tendineae of the tricuspid valve, bacterial endocarditis, heartworms, endocardiosis or congenital anomalies, resulting in regurgitation of blood from the right ventricle into the right atrium during systole.
tricuspid regurgitation
see tricuspid insufficiency (above).
tricuspid valve
the valve located between the right atrium and right ventricle. Called also right atrioventricular valve.
References in periodicals archive ?
Only one case had moderate tricuspid valve regurgitation post-operatively, while 22.
Diagnosis can be grossly delayed, since right-sided murmurs often go undetected, while peripheral stigmata are absent [4] Pulmonary embolism occurs in 75-100% especially in the cases of tricuspid valve IE.
The patient was referred for debridement and bioprosthetic tricuspid valve replacement because of severe TR, large vegetation size (>20 mm) and persistent pulmonary embolisation despite adequate antibiotic therapy.
Our patient, a non-drug abuser with normal tricuspid valve had TVE with septic pulmonary embolization.
Our patient had elevated jugular venous pressure and moderate tricuspid regurgitation, both of which are indicative of right ventricular dysfunction.
There was no statistical relationship between weight and other variables including patent arterial duct, tricuspid regurgitation, and pulmonary hypertension, systolic and diastolic dysfunction.
Doppler Tissue Imaging for Assessment of Peak Systolic Velocity of Tricuspid Lateral Annulus.
Tricuspid valve atresia, valvular pulmonary stenosis (55 mmHg) and inlet ventricular septal defect (1.
The most common lesions seen in RHD in this study were of regurgitant type predominantly involving MV followed by tricuspid and AVs.
Flow was seen through the defect during both systole and diastole excluding the possibility of tricuspid regurgitation artifact.