trichuriasis


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trichuriasis

 [trik″u-ri´ah-sis]
infection with species of Trichuris; in adults it may be asymptomatic, but in children it may cause vomiting, diarrhea, and rectal prolapse.

trich·u·ri·a·sis

(trik'yū-rī'ă-sis),
Infection with nematodes of the genus Trichuris. In humans, intestinal parasitization by T. trichiura is usually asymptomatic and not associated with peripheral eosinophilia; in massive infections it frequently induces diarrhea or rectal prolapse.

trichuriasis

/trich·u·ri·a·sis/ (trik″u-ri´ah-sis) infection with Trichuris, often asymptomatic in adults but with gastrointestinal symptoms in children.

trichuriasis

(trĭk′yə-rī′ə-sĭs)
n. pl. trichuria·ses (-sēz)
Infestation of the large intestine with the whipworm Trichuris trichiura. It is usually asymptomatic, but in massive infections can cause diarrhea or rectal prolapse.

trichuriasis

[trik′yərī′əsis]
Etymology: Gk, thrix + oura, tail, osis, condition
infestation with the roundworm Trichuris trichiura. The condition is usually asymptomatic, but heavy infestation may cause nausea, abdominal pain, diarrhea, and, occasionally, anemia and rectal prolapse. It is common in tropical areas with poor sanitation. Eggs are passed in feces. Contamination of the hands, food, and water results in ingestion of the eggs, which hatch in the intestines where the adult worms embed two thirds of their length in the intestinal mucosa. The worms may live 15 to 20 years. Treatment is with mebendazole; prevention includes proper disposal of feces and good personal hygiene. Also called trichiuriasis [trik′ē-] .

trichuriasis

Whipworm infection Infectious disease Infection by Trichuris trichiura, which occurs by oral contact with whipworm ova in contaminated soil; eggs hatch, worm embeds in GI mucosa, primarily in cecum and appendix Clinical Heavy infestation causes bloody, mucus-like diarrhea, rectal prolapse

trich·u·ri·a·sis

(trik'yū-rī'ă-sis)
Infection with nematodes (whipworms) of the genus Trichuris. In humans, intestinal parasitization by T. trichiura is usually asymptomatic; in massive infections, it frequently induces diarrhea or rectal prolapse.

trichuriasis

Infection of the large intestine with whipworms.

trich·u·ri·a·sis

(trik'yū-rī'ă-sis)
Infection with nematodes of the genus Trichuris. In humans, intestinal parasitization by T. trichiura is usually asymptomatic and not associated with peripheral eosinophilia.

trichuriasis

the disease caused by the infestation of the cecum by Trichuris spp. The most obvious clinical feature is diarrhea sometimes with mucus and blood.
References in periodicals archive ?
Juan JO, Lopez CN, Gargala G, Favennec L (2000) Comparative clinical studies of nitazoxanide, albendazole and praziquantel in the treatment of ascariasis, trichuriasis and hymenolepiasis in children from Peru.
TABLE 6--Structure of contagious diseases in the population of soldiers treated in UNIFIL Hospital from 1993 to 2000 (N = 139) Year of Parasitic Trichuriasis Ancylostomiasis examination diseases 1993 40 7 10 1994 12 2 4 1995 2 0 0 1996 4 0 0 1997 7 0 0 1998 11 0 0 1999 11 2 0 2000 3 0 0 Number of patients 90 11 14 Number of infestations 123 21 20 (partly multiple) Year of Giardiasis Ascariasis Strongyloidosis examination 1993 8 1 0 1994 2 0 1 1995 0 0 0 1996 1 0 0 1997 4 0 0 1998 0 1 7 1999 0 1 2 2000 0 1 0 Number of patients 15 4 10 Number of infestations 18 11 10 (partly multiple) Source: UNIFIL.
Most human cases of trichuriasis are caused by Tric.
The diagnosis of trichuriasis is routinely made by coproscopy, finding typical barrel shaped eggs with unstained polar plugs that measure 50 to 54 mm by 22 to 23 mm (Figure 1).
Soil-transmitted helminth infections, primarily ascariasis and trichuriasis, were common among children in Aceh Besar and Simeulue, where approximately 75% of school-aged children and half of children aged 6-59 months were infected.
School performance, nutritional status and trichuriasis in Jamaican schoolchildren.
Bethony J, Brooker S, Albonico M, Geiger SM, Loukas A, Diemert D, Hotez PJ: Soil-transmitted helminth infections: ascariasis, trichuriasis, and hookworm.
Amoebiasis, giardiasis, ascariasis, hookworm infection, and trichuriasis are among the most common intestinal parasitic infections worldwide and are closely related to socio-economic status, poor sanitation, inadequate medical care and absence of safe drinking water supplies [5,17,19,38,39].
Among other helminthic infections, the most popular ones are ancylostomiasis, strongyloidiasis, trichuriasis and taeniasis.
Burden of disease attributable to unsafe water, sanitation and hygiene, by disease, South Africa, 2000 ICD-9 codes included in Disease assessment Deaths YLLs Diarrhoeal diseases 001, 002, 13 368 375 476 004, 006-009 Schistosomiasis 120 20 445 Intestinal parasites, including ascariasis, trichuriasis, hookworm 126-129 46 1 612 Total attributable burden 13 434 377 533 Disease YLDs DALYs Diarrhoeal diseases 10 685 386 160 Schistosomiasis 21 617 22 062 Intestinal parasites, including ascariasis, trichuriasis, hookworm 8 956 10 568 Total attributable burden 41 258 418 790 YLLs = years of life lost; YLDs = years lived with disability; DALYs = disability-adjusted life years; ICD-9 = International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision.