Trichoptera

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Related to trichopterans: Orthoptera, Mecoptera, Diptera

Tri·chop·ter·a

(tri-kop'tĕr-ă),
An order of insects in which the aquatic larvae (caddis flies) construct a protective case (caddis) of bits of submerged material in a highly specific form; commonly found attached under stones in freshwater streams. The adult caddis flies, having hairy wings, shed their hairs and epithelia, causing hay fever-like (allergic) symptoms in sensitive people.
[tricho- + G. pteron, wing]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

Trichoptera

the insect order containing the caddis flies. The larvae are aquatic and often live in a case or tube which they carry around; they include herbivores and carnivores and some species act as indicators of pollution. The adults have reduced mouthparts and feed only rarely.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
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As discussed in the introduction, this is the only specified adult synapomorphy for Trichoptera [22] and suggests that the Necrotauliidae are trichopterans.
The chironomids (species of the genera Cricotopus and Polypedilum), oligochaetes (mainly Naididae), the hirudinean Erpobdella octoculata, the trichopteran Agraylea multipunctata, the ephemeropteran Caenis sp., and the amphipods Gmelinoides fasciatus and Pontogammarus robustoides colonized the drifting algae (Fig.
Also in Indiana, Brack (1985) found dipterans, trichopterans, coleopterans (including the Asiatic oak weevil), lepidopterans, homopterans, hymenopterans, neuropterans, and plecopterans represented, in decreasing order of importance, in the diet of this species.
At the ordinal level, the major shredders in both streams were dipterans, trichopterans, and plecopterans.
The bats switched to coleopterans, trichopterans, lepidopterans and a variety of other items during the summer, then again fed on chironomids, including even pupae, in the fall.
Larger individuals (2.0-3.0 mm HCW) primarily ate Baetis tricaudatus Dodds and Ephemerella subvaria McDunnough nymphs, as well as chironomids and some trichopterans. Diatoms and MIP were ingested also, but in smaller quantities.
Trichopterans constituted the next highest proportion (4.6%), while Collembola, Coleoptera, Odonata, and Bivalvia were minor proportions.
Terrestrial invertebrates (22.8%) were the second ranked prey taxa consumed by common shiner, whereas trichopterans (mainly leptocerids) (22.5%) and ephemeropterans (mainly baetids) (10.3%) were important taxa in the diet of cutlip minnow.
Sculpin from 15% embedded streams consumed ephemeropterans, trichopterans, and lepidopterans while sculpin from 35% embedded streams consumed trichopterans and chironomids.
Ephemeropterans were second most abundant (30% occurrence, 13% by weight), followed by terrestrial insects (20%, 9%), and trichopterans (18%, 4%).