trichloroethylene

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trichloroethylene

 [tri″klor-o-eth´ĭ-lēn]
a widely used industrial solvent, formerly used as an inhalation analgesic and anesthetic; exposure to high vapor concentrations can cause fatal poisoning.

trichloroethylene

/tri·chlo·ro·eth·y·lene/ (-eth´ĭ-lēn) a clear, mobile liquid used as an industrial solvent; formerly used as an inhalant anesthetic.

trichloroethylene

[trīklôr′ō·eth′ilēn]
a general anesthetic, administered by mask with N2O, for dentistry, minor surgery, and the first stages of labor. It is too cardiotoxic for deep anesthesia, even in light planes of anesthesia. It is not currently used in clinical anesthesia practice in developed countries.

trichloroethylene, trichlorethylene

a volatile, nonflammable solvent with a similar odor to chloroform. Used in the extraction of oils and fats from plant and animal materials for the purpose of using the oil. The residue is available as animal feed. Has anesthetic and analgesic properties but is not recommended for use as either in animals.

trichloroethylene-extracted soybean meal
see trichloroethylene-extracted soybean meal.
References in periodicals archive ?
The success of bioremediation relies on the presence and activities of microorganisms that are capable of degrading TCE by catalyzing sequential dechlorination reactions, thereby transforming trichloroethene (TCE) [right arrow] dichloroethene (DCE) [right arrow] vinyl chloride (VC) [right arrow] ethene (Hendrickson et al.
3]) of trichloroethene, which (for comparison) represents half of the integrated Occupational Safety and Health Administration permissible exposure limit of 100 ppm for occupational exposure for an 8-h workshift [171, resulted in estimated absorbed doses from 23 to 90 mg with peak blood concentrations averaging ~1200 [micro]g/L.
Renal cell carcinomas in trichloroethene (TRI) exposed persons are associated with somatic mutations in the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumour suppressor gene.
The soil and groundwater there has been contaminated with trichloroethene, or TCE.
Since 1985, several studies had revealed contamination in the soil, bedrock, and groundwater by volatile organic compounds, most notably trichloroethene (TCE).
Historical use of solvents in the manufacturing of electronic components at the CTS Site contaminated the soil and groundwater with trichloroethene (TCE) and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs).
The most recent figures show the pump-and-treat system has cumulatively removed 22,264 pounds of chromium and 2,175 pounds of the volatile organic compound trichloroethene, according to the last official five-year review released in 2013.
Data shows elevated levels of trichloroethene (TCE) in groundwater north of the proposed one-acre treatment area, near monitoring well clusters MW6 and MW7.
The site has groundwater contamination from chlorinated solvents, including tetrachloroethene, trichloroethene and degradation products.