trichina


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Related to trichina: pinworm, Trichina worm

trichina

 [trĭ-ki´nah] (Gr.)
an individual organism of the genus Trichinella.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

Trichina

(tri-kī'nă),
Old name for a genus of nematode worms, correctly called Trichinella.

tri·chi·na

, pl.

tri·chi·nae

(tri-kī'nă, -nē),
A larval worm of the genus Trichinella; the infective form in pork.
[Mod. L., fr. G. thrix (trich-), a hair]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

trichina

(trĭ-kī′nə)
n. pl. trichi·nae (-nē) or trichi·nas
Any of several small parasitic nematode worms of the genus Trichinella, especially T. spiralis, that infest the intestines of various mammals and that move through the bloodstream as larvae, becoming encysted in muscles.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

tri·chi·na

, pl. trichinae (tri-kī'nă, -nē)
A larval worm of the genus Trichinella; the infective form in pork.
[Mod. L., fr. G. thrix (trich-), a hair]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Trichina

An individual example of Trichinella spiralis.
Mentioned in: Trichinosis
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Current candidates for irradiation are fresh produce such as strawberries, potatoes, and other perishable items; poultry and seafood (where salmonella is definitely a problem); and pork (to kill off the parasite trichina).
For another example, to tach that trichina is a roundworm found in uncooked pork and that the worm causes illness in humans, the keyword "trick" was employed to depict trichina.
The trichina parasite, rarely present, is destroyed at 137[deg].
But a quick blood test, just approved for commercial use, can identify which pigs contain the parasitic trichina worm.
An innovative, on-farm program to certify pigs as free of trichina parasites could become a model for excluding other meatborne diseases from foods.
pork, long approved for irradiation and ionization, is not being commercially treated--"and it has nothing to do with negative consumer perceptions." As Olson explained, "The dose levels currently approved for pork treatment are not high enough to kill Trichina. They're just high enough to sterilize the pathogen and destroy its capacity to reproduce.