trichiasis


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trichiasis

 [trĭ-ki´ah-sis]
1. a condition of ingrowing hairs about an orifice.
2. inversion of the eyelashes, characterized by excessive tearing and the sensation of a foreign body in the eye.
3. the appearance of hairlike filaments in the urine.

tri·chi·a·sis

(tri-kī'ă-sis),
A condition in which the hair adjacent to a natural orifice turns inward and causes irritation; for example, in inversion of an eyelid (entropion), eyelashes irritate the eye.
Synonym(s): trichoma, trichomatosis
[trich- + G. -iasis, condition]

trichiasis

/tri·chi·a·sis/ (trĭ-ki´ah-sis)
1. a condition of ingrowing hairs about an orifice, or ingrowing eyelashes.
2. appearance of hairlike filaments in the urine.

trichiasis

(trĭ-kī′ə-sĭs)
n.
A condition of ingrowing hairs about an orifice, especially ingrowing eyelashes.

trichiasis

[trikī′əsis]
Etymology: Gk, thrix, hair, osis, condition
an abnormal inversion of the eyelashes that irritates the eyeball. It usually follows infection or inflammation. Compare ectropion.
enlarge picture
Trichiasis in late trachoma

tri·chi·a·sis

(tri-kī'ă-sis)
A condition in which the hair adjacent to a natural orifice turns inward and causes irritation; in inversion of an eyelid (entropion), eyelash irritation of the eye.
[trich- + G. -iasis, condition]

trichiasis

Inturning or ingrowing of the eyelashes so that they rub against the CORNEA of the eye causing severe discomfort and possible abrasion, infection and ulceration. Trichiasis is a feature of TRACHOMA. Removal of lashes affords relief but definitive treatment involves plastic procedures to evert the lid margins. See also ENTROPION.

Trichiasis

A disease of the eye, in which the eyelashes, being turned in upon the eyeball, produce constant irritation by the motion of the lids.

trichiasis 

A condition in which the eyelashes due to entropion, blepharitis or injury, are directed towards the globe and cause irritation of the cornea and conjunctiva. Temporary relief may be achieved with epilation but permanent treatment consists of cryotherapy or laser ablation or in severe cases surgical excision and replacement with a mucous membrane (Fig. T19). See distichiasis; epilation; therapeutic soft contact lens.
Fig. T19 Trichiasisenlarge picture
Fig. T19 Trichiasis

trichiasis

1. a condition of ingrowing hairs about an orifice, or ingrowing eyelashes.
2. the appearance of hairlike filaments in the urine.
Enlarge picture
Trichiasis. By permission from Slatter D, Textbook of Small Animal Surgery, Saunders, 2002

caruncular trichiasis (1)
hairs growing from the lacrimal caruncle, particularly in brachycephalic dogs. Called also aberrant dermis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Trachoma was endemic; trichiasis was corrected by surgical incisions of the eyelid, and needle cautery.
Because of changes in disease endemicity, active disease and trachomatous trichiasis are less correlated than they were 50 years ago; for example, active trachoma has disappeared in most areas of China, where it was once endemic.
Survey data also show that women have an excess risk for corneal opacity, trichiasis, and scarring; women account for 60% to 85% of all cases of trichiasis in the community (11-14).
number of episodes, persistence of disease, higher bacterial loads) help explain the excess conjunctival scarring and trichiasis in women?
If these findings are applied to trachoma-endemic settings, they would suggest that corneal damage is more likely to develop in women with trichiasis than men.
Other Factors Explaining Excess Conjunctival Scarring and Trichiasis in Women
In a study of women, infection in adulthood, although not common, increased the risk for trichiasis 2.
After five minutes, the cotton bud is removed and the presence of fluorescein (positive) on the bud indicates a patent lacrimal drainage system and the epiphora may be the result of lacrimal hypersecretion, caused by conditions such as ocular allergy, dry eye, blepharitis, trichiasis, distichiasis, entropion, ectropion, foreign bodies, concretions, corneal disease or anterior uveitis.
Table 1 Characteristics of anterior lid margin disease Symptoms Signs Eyelids stuck together on waking Madarosis (loss of eye lashes) Itchiness Trichiasis (misdirected eye lashes) Glare Poliosis (white lashes) Blurred vision Telangiectasia Conjunctival injection Lid margin hypertrophy Lid scarring
Reflex hypersecretion may be caused by blepharitis, trichiasis, distichiasis, entropion, conjunctival concretions, foreign bodies, dry eyes, eyelashes 'stuck' in the tear punctum, corneal ulcers, corneal abrasions, and anterior uveitis (through photophobia).
The research was carried out in Ethiopia and has found that, whilst surgery is the preferred option for the treatment of minor trichiasis, epilation (plucking eyelashes) is a suitable approach when surgery is not available.
In a separate study, the team found that using absorbable sutures is as effective as silk sutures in surgery for major trichiasis, but that absorbable sutures have the added advantage of eliminating the need for patients to return to a clinic to have the stitches removed.