triatomine bug


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.
Related to triatomine bug: kissing bug

triatomine bug

(trī-ăt′ə-mēn′)
n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Triatomine bugs also are found in the United States, but only a few cases of Chagas disease from contact with the bugs have been documented in this country (2).
Identification of bloodmeal sources and Trypanosoma cruzi infection in triatomine bugs (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) from residential settings in Texas, the United States.
Triatomine bugs are one-half to an inch long and if you think you have been bitten by one, wash your hands thoroughly and clean the bite site gently but thoroughly with antiseptic.
Attraction of triatomine bug vectors of Chagas's disease to betalights [Letter], Nature 231:268.
(8) The disease is transmitted to humans through the feces of triatomine bugs, known as 'kissing bugs.' (6) These bugs typically live in the cracks of poorly-constructed homes in rural or in suburban areas.
The houses of all patients and their contacts were rigorously searched for triatomine bugs, but none were found.
Transmission is usually by contamination of a person with parasite-laden feces of a triatomine bug (family Reduviidae, subfamily Triatominae, commonly known as kissing bugs), which deposits feces on the skin while feeding.
Ecotopes often triatomine bug species (Hemiptera: Reduvidae) from the vicinity of Belem, Para State, Brazil.
Genetic variability and geographic differentiation among three species of triatomine bugs (Hemiptera-Reduviidae).
However, acute cases of Chagas disease are still observed due to transmission by native species of triatomine bugs, which continue to invade and eventually colonize homes in different regions of Brazil [15-20] including the northeast region [21-23].
The biology of the Triatomine bugs native to south central Texas and assessment of the risk they pose for autochthonous Chagas disease exposure.
Transmission occurs when triatomine bugs, commonly called "kissing bugs," pierce the skin to feed and leave behind parasite-infected feces that can enter the bloodstream; pregnant women can also transmit Chagas to their newborns.