section

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section

 [sek´shun]
1. an act of cutting.
2. a cut surface.
3. a segment or subdivision of an organ.
abdominal section laparotomy; incision of the abdominal wall.
cesarean section delivery of a fetus by incision through the abdominal wall and uterus; see also cesarean section.
frontal section a section through the body passing at right angles to the median plane, dividing the body into dorsal and ventral parts.
frozen section a specimen cut by microtome from tissue that has been frozen; see also frozen section.
perineal section external urethrotomy.
sagittal section a section through the body coinciding with the sagittal suture, thus dividing the body into right and left halves.
serial s's histologic sections of a specimen made in consecutive order and so arranged for the purpose of microscopic examination.

sec·tion

(sek'shŭn), Avoid the redundant phrase cut section.
1. The act of cutting.
2. A cut or division.
3. A segment or part of any organ or structure delimited from the remainder.
4. A cut surface.
5. A thin slice of tissue, cells, microorganisms, or any other material for examination under the microscope. Synonym(s): microscopic section
[L. sectio, a cutting, fr. seco, to cut]

section

/sec·tion/ (sek´shun)
1. an act of cutting.
2. a cut surface.
3. a segment or subdivision of an organ.
4. a supplemental taxonomic category subordinate to a subgenus but superior to a species or series.

abdominal section  laparotomy.
cesarean section  delivery of a fetus by incision through the abdominal wall and uterus.
Enlarge picture
Cesarean section. (A), Classic; (B), low vertical; (C), transverse incisions.
frozen section  a specimen cut by microtome from tissue that has been frozen.
perineal section  external urethrotomy.
Saemisch's section  see under operation.
serial section  histologic sections made in consecutive order and so arranged for the purpose of microscopic examination.

section

(sĕk′shən)
n.
1. A cut or division.
2. The act or process of separating or cutting, especially the surgical cutting or dividing of tissue.
3. A thin slice, as of tissue, suitable for microscopic examination.
4. A cesarean section.
v.
1. To separate or divide into parts.
2. To cut or divide tissue surgically.

section

[sek′shən]
Etymology: L, sectio, a cutting
1 n, a cut surface or slice of tissue.
2 v, the act of cutting tissue.

section

Lab medicine
noun A College of American Pathologists term for a part of a hospital lab—chemistry, microbiology, blood bank—with a section supervisor.
 
Medspeak-UK
noun A part of an Act of Parliament.

verb To detain a person in hospital under the Mental Health Act 1983.
 
Obstetrics
noun Caesarean section, see there.
 
Pathology
noun A slice of tissue, as prepared for histologic evaluation.

Vox populi
noun A grouping, part, portion, segment.

section

Obstetrics See Cesarean section Surgical pathology A slice of tissue, as prepared for histologic evaluation. See Frozen section, Gough section, Paraffin section, Permanent section, Poincaré section, Slab section, Thick section, Thin section.

sec·tion

(sek'shŭn)
1. The act of cutting.
2. A cut or division.
3. A segment or part of any organ or structure delimited from the remainder.
4. A cut surface.
5. A thin slice of tissue, cells, microorganisms, or any material for examination under the microscope.
[L. sectio, a cutting, fr. seco, to cut]

section

1. an act of cutting.
2. a cut surface.
3. a segment or subdivision of an organ.

abdominal section
laparotomy; incision of the abdominal wall.
cesarean section
delivery of a fetus by incision through the abdominal wall and uterus; see also cesarean section.
frontal section
a section through the body passing at right angles to the median plane, dividing the body into dorsal and ventral parts.
frozen section
a specimen cut by microtome from tissue that has been frozen; see also frozen section.
perineal section
external urethrotomy.
sagittal section
a section through the body coinciding with the sagittal suture, thus dividing the body into right and left halves.
serial s's
histological sections of a specimen made in consecutive order and so arranged for the purpose of microscopic examination.
trial section
the gradual transverse cutting of a tissue or structure, usually to ascertain its composition or to limit the incision to only one component, e.g. scar tissue surrounding a nerve.

Patient discussion about section

Q. What are the risks of C-section? See that all the pregnant movie stars are having C- sections instead of natural child birth. Maybe I should have one too, instead of giving birth regularly? Are there any risks?

A. Thanks.. Now I understand better the risks of c-section.

Q. How is a C-section done? My wife is expecting twins and her Doctor scheduled a C- section for her. How is it done?

A. My wife had a c-section done when we had our daughter. I did not get to see the procedure, but I did hear it. It was graphic, but really quick.

Q. When is a C-section needed? My wife is pregnant now and I wanted to know when do women need to have a C- section as opposed to natural birth?

A. sually a C- section is done when there are problems during labor like when the baby is in trouble or the labor is stuck and not progressing over a long period of time.

More discussions about section
References in periodicals archive ?
It is not the least paradoxical effect of the trial section that the point where Ollie's previous account is vindicated results in the silencing of his narrative voice.
The Intermediate Senior Show Cross and Hunter Trial sections were dominated by the Sunderland-based Emma Pearce and Tyler who took both sections from two outings with 11 points from a first and second.
Moye noted that the firm will announce a new Trial Section Vice- Chair next week.
During the ride, which can be at any pace, there are four time trial sections.
We've implemented these new test methods that I've developed based on 50 trial sections around the province," Hesp said.
The modern world offers Franklin situations both hilarious (the absurdity of urban transit) and heartbreaking (gang violence), and while the trial sections serve to remind the reader of the accomplishments of the historical Franklin (while accenting his more personal inadequacies), his meanderings between Boston, Philadelphia, and New York flesh out the virtues of Benjamin Franklin the man (while highlighting the contemporary consequences of his historical failures).