triage

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triage

 [tre-ahzh´] (Fr.)
the sorting out and classification of casualties of war or other disaster, to determine priority of need and proper place of treatment.
disaster triage in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as establishing priorities of patient care for urgent treatment while allocating scarce resources.
triage: emergency center in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as establishing priorities and initiating treatment for patients in an emergency center.
triage: telephone in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as determining the nature and urgency of a problem or problems and providing directions for the level of care required, over the telephone. See also telehealth.

tri·age

(trē'ahzh),
1. Medical screening of patients to determine their relative priority for treatment order.
2. The separation of a large number of casualties, in military or civilian disaster medical care, into three groups: those who cannot be expected to survive even with treatment; those who will recover without treatment; and the highest priority group, those who will not survive without treatment.
[Fr. sorting]

triage

(trē-äzh′, trē′äzh′)
n.
A process for sorting injured people into groups based on their need for or likely benefit from immediate medical treatment. Triage is used in hospital emergency rooms, on battlefields, and at disaster sites when limited medical resources must be allocated.
tr.v. tri·aged, tri·aging, tri·ages
To sort or allocate by triage: triaged the patients according to their symptoms.

triage

The sorting of patients in A&E according to urgency, separating them in the first instance into majors (immediate, urgent) and minors (standard, non-urgent).

triage

triage, French, sorting Emergency medicine A method of ranking sick or injured people according to the severity of their sickness or injury in order to ensure that medical and nursing staff facilities are used most efficiently; assessment of injury intensity and the immediacy or urgency for medical attention. See Streamlined review.
Triage priorities
Highest priority Respiratory, facial, neck, chest, cardiovascular, hemorrhage, neck injuries
Very high priority Shock, retroperitoneal or intraperitoneal hemorrhage
High priority Cranial, cerebral, spinal cord, burns
Low priority Lower genitourinary tract, peripheral nerves and vessels, splinted fractures, soft tissue lesions

tri·age

(trē'ahzh)
Medical screening of patients to determine their relative priority for treatment; the separation of a large number of casualties, in military or civilian disaster medical care, into three groups: 1) those who cannot be expected to survive even with treatment; 2) those who will recover without treatment; 3) the highest priority group, those who will not survive without treatment.
[Fr. sorting]

triage

A selection process, used in war or disaster, to divide casualties into three groups so as to maximize resources and avoid wastage of essential surgical skills on hopeless cases. In triage, an experienced surgeon sorts cases rapidly into those needing urgent treatment, those that will survive without immediate treatment, and those beyond hope of benefit from treatment. Triage is also used to assign treatment in the event of the appearance of a number of men suffering acute chest pain.

tri·age

(trē'ahzh)
1. Medical screening of patients to determine their relative priority for treatment.
2. Separation of a large number of casualties, in military or civilian disaster medical care, into three groups: those who cannot be expected to survive even with treatment; those who will recover without treatment; and the highest priority, those who will not survive without treatment.
[Fr. sorting]
References in periodicals archive ?
Most likely the failure of triaging all patients reflects difficulties in the implementation of this new routine.
The nurses demonstrated excellent interrater agreement and accuracy when triaging written case scenarios.
HPV testing was not a useful tool for triaging women with LSIL since the majority of these women had some type of HPV DNA, Dr.
Thus it is essential for the health professionals to be well-versed with the concepts of triaging. This paper intends to review the basic definitions and the common types of triaging that is used commonly in hospitals.
University hospitals can, and should, take a lead in providing hands-on training for pre-hospital personnel through NGOs to ensure development of competent and confident workers who can perform pre-hospital triaging. This would benefit the EDs to control overcrowding and at large to reduce mortality and morbidity secondary to trauma.
The 2007 case series: At the start of the new triaging process, triage form collection boxes were placed in the acute care, medical emergency and medical outpatient clinic rooms; the nurses and medical officers attending to patients completed the triage forms, which the principal investigator collected on a daily basis and stored in boxes in a locked office.
In the analysis carried out 2 years after introduction of the formal triaging system, more than 90% of children with emergency signs required admission.
Unique among triaging tools world-wide, the SATS includes clinical discriminators and an age-appropriate composite score--the popular Triage Early Warning Score (TEWS), and as a whole 'is more elegant and accurate'.
The SATS is more effective than the MEWS in triaging both medical and trauma patients correctly in a rural ED setting.