triage

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triage

 [tre-ahzh´] (Fr.)
the sorting out and classification of casualties of war or other disaster, to determine priority of need and proper place of treatment.
disaster triage in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as establishing priorities of patient care for urgent treatment while allocating scarce resources.
triage: emergency center in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as establishing priorities and initiating treatment for patients in an emergency center.
triage: telephone in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as determining the nature and urgency of a problem or problems and providing directions for the level of care required, over the telephone. See also telehealth.

tri·age

(trē'ahzh),
1. Medical screening of patients to determine their relative priority for treatment order.
2. The separation of a large number of casualties, in military or civilian disaster medical care, into three groups: those who cannot be expected to survive even with treatment; those who will recover without treatment; and the highest priority group, those who will not survive without treatment.
[Fr. sorting]

triage

(trē-äzh′, trē′äzh′)
n.
A process for sorting injured people into groups based on their need for or likely benefit from immediate medical treatment. Triage is used in hospital emergency rooms, on battlefields, and at disaster sites when limited medical resources must be allocated.
tr.v. tri·aged, tri·aging, tri·ages
To sort or allocate by triage: triaged the patients according to their symptoms.

triage

The sorting of patients in A&E according to urgency, separating them in the first instance into majors (immediate, urgent) and minors (standard, non-urgent).

triage

triage, French, sorting Emergency medicine A method of ranking sick or injured people according to the severity of their sickness or injury in order to ensure that medical and nursing staff facilities are used most efficiently; assessment of injury intensity and the immediacy or urgency for medical attention. See Streamlined review.
Triage priorities
Highest priority Respiratory, facial, neck, chest, cardiovascular, hemorrhage, neck injuries
Very high priority Shock, retroperitoneal or intraperitoneal hemorrhage
High priority Cranial, cerebral, spinal cord, burns
Low priority Lower genitourinary tract, peripheral nerves and vessels, splinted fractures, soft tissue lesions

tri·age

(trē'ahzh)
Medical screening of patients to determine their relative priority for treatment; the separation of a large number of casualties, in military or civilian disaster medical care, into three groups: 1) those who cannot be expected to survive even with treatment; 2) those who will recover without treatment; 3) the highest priority group, those who will not survive without treatment.
[Fr. sorting]

triage

A selection process, used in war or disaster, to divide casualties into three groups so as to maximize resources and avoid wastage of essential surgical skills on hopeless cases. In triage, an experienced surgeon sorts cases rapidly into those needing urgent treatment, those that will survive without immediate treatment, and those beyond hope of benefit from treatment. Triage is also used to assign treatment in the event of the appearance of a number of men suffering acute chest pain.

tri·age

(trē'ahzh)
1. Medical screening of patients to determine their relative priority for treatment.
2. Separation of a large number of casualties, in military or civilian disaster medical care, into three groups: those who cannot be expected to survive even with treatment; those who will recover without treatment; and the highest priority, those who will not survive without treatment.
[Fr. sorting]
References in periodicals archive ?
Significantly fewer healthdirect patients who self-referred after low-urgency dispositions were triaged as ATS 2 (4.0 percent, 95 percent CI 3.8 to 4.3 percent) compared to the general population (8.4 percent, 95 percent CI 8.3 to 8.4 percent) and healthdirect-compliant patients (7.0 percent, 95 percent CI 6.9 to 7.2 percent, Table 4).
As shown in Table 5, rates of hospitalization by ATS level on ED arrival did not significantly differ between compliant attenders and self-referred groups, except for patients triaged as ATS 5, who were significantly more likely to be hospitalized in the compliant attender group (5.7 percent, 95 percent CI 5.2-6.2) than in the self-referred group (4.0 percent, 95 percent CI 3.3-4.8).
A total of 1171 children were referred to the Department of Pediatrics for emergency assessment during the study period, and 790 (67 %) patients were triaged and included in the study.
In the ED, 301 (38 %) children were triaged to priority green, 303 (39 %) to priority yellow, 110 (14 %) to priority orange, and 68 (9 %) to priority red.
Of these, 187 were triaged for routine management, 52 were triaged to the on-site collaborative mental health program for more specialized interventions or psychiatric consultation, 36 were triaged to receive more intensive services at the Family Counseling Center's primary location, and 4 were referred for emergency evaluation and inpatient psychiatric hospitalization.
Convenience sampling included all children triaged by the nursing staff on that particular shift and lasted for 2 months from 3 October to 30 November 2011.
Pooled data demonstrated admission proportions of 72.8%, 29.0%, 27.9% and 4.7% for patients triaged into SATS acuity levels emergency, very urgent, urgent and non-urgent, respectively (Fig.
Of the children 58.8% (530) were triaged green, 37.5% (338) orange and 3.8% (34) red.
Both of those who died were triaged red--one died in the MEU despite resuscitation efforts, and the other in the ICU within 24 hours of admission.
We also considered patients in our subset who were inappropriately triaged by each triage tool.
Patients were considered to be emergencies if they were triaged red or orange; those triaged yellow were termed urgent; a green triage code represented patients who were routine cases; and blue represented those who were obviously dead on arrival.
A total of 15 681 patients were triaged and had paperwork completed; 606 were seen in the ED and had forms raised, but had no triage information recorded.