triage

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triage

 [tre-ahzh´] (Fr.)
the sorting out and classification of casualties of war or other disaster, to determine priority of need and proper place of treatment.
disaster triage in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as establishing priorities of patient care for urgent treatment while allocating scarce resources.
triage: emergency center in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as establishing priorities and initiating treatment for patients in an emergency center.
triage: telephone in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as determining the nature and urgency of a problem or problems and providing directions for the level of care required, over the telephone. See also telehealth.

tri·age

(trē'ahzh),
1. Medical screening of patients to determine their relative priority for treatment order.
2. The separation of a large number of casualties, in military or civilian disaster medical care, into three groups: those who cannot be expected to survive even with treatment; those who will recover without treatment; and the highest priority group, those who will not survive without treatment.
[Fr. sorting]

triage

/tri·age/ (tre-ahzh´) [Fr.]
1. the sorting out of casualties of war or other disaster to determine priority of need and proper place of treatment.
2. by extension, the sorting and prioritizing of nonemergency patients for treatment.

triage

(trē-äzh′, trē′äzh′)
n.
A process for sorting injured people into groups based on their need for or likely benefit from immediate medical treatment. Triage is used in hospital emergency rooms, on battlefields, and at disaster sites when limited medical resources must be allocated.
tr.v. tri·aged, tri·aging, tri·ages
To sort or allocate by triage: triaged the patients according to their symptoms.

triage

[trē·äzh′]
Etymology: Fr, trier, to sort out
1 in military medicine, a classification of casualties of war and other disasters according to the gravity of injuries, urgency of treatment, and place for treatment.
2 a process in which a group of patients is sorted according to their need for care. The kind of illness or injury, the severity of the problem, and the facilities available govern the process, as in a hospital emergency department.
3 in disaster medicine, a process in which a large group of patients is sorted so that care can be concentrated on those who are likely to survive.

triage

The sorting of patients in A&E according to urgency, separating them in the first instance into majors (immediate, urgent) and minors (standard, non-urgent).

triage

triage, French, sorting Emergency medicine A method of ranking sick or injured people according to the severity of their sickness or injury in order to ensure that medical and nursing staff facilities are used most efficiently; assessment of injury intensity and the immediacy or urgency for medical attention. See Streamlined review.
Triage priorities
Highest priority Respiratory, facial, neck, chest, cardiovascular, hemorrhage, neck injuries
Very high priority Shock, retroperitoneal or intraperitoneal hemorrhage
High priority Cranial, cerebral, spinal cord, burns
Low priority Lower genitourinary tract, peripheral nerves and vessels, splinted fractures, soft tissue lesions

tri·age

(trē'ahzh)
Medical screening of patients to determine their relative priority for treatment; the separation of a large number of casualties, in military or civilian disaster medical care, into three groups: 1) those who cannot be expected to survive even with treatment; 2) those who will recover without treatment; 3) the highest priority group, those who will not survive without treatment.
[Fr. sorting]

triage

A selection process, used in war or disaster, to divide casualties into three groups so as to maximize resources and avoid wastage of essential surgical skills on hopeless cases. In triage, an experienced surgeon sorts cases rapidly into those needing urgent treatment, those that will survive without immediate treatment, and those beyond hope of benefit from treatment. Triage is also used to assign treatment in the event of the appearance of a number of men suffering acute chest pain.

triage

screening to prioritize need and locate patient to the most beneficial treatment

triage (trēˑ·äj),

n a process of sorting a group of patients in a hospital or military or disaster setting to determine the immediacy of an individual's need for treatment. The type of injury or illness, the condition's severity, the level of urgency involved, the availability of medical facilities, and the likelihood of survival are the criteria used in triage.

tri·age

(trē'ahzh)
1. Medical screening of patients to determine their relative priority for treatment.
2. Separation of a large number of casualties, in military or civilian disaster medical care, into three groups: those who cannot be expected to survive even with treatment; those who will recover without treatment; and the highest priority, those who will not survive without treatment.
[Fr. sorting]

triage (trēäzh´),

n 1. (in military medicine) a classification of casualties of war and other disasters according to the gravity of injuries, urgency of treatment, and place for treatment.
2. a process in which a group of patients is sorted according to need for care. The kind of illness or injury, severity of the problem, and facilities available govern the process, as in the emergency room of a hospital.
3. (in disaster medicine) a process in which a large group of patients is sorted so that care may be concentrated on those who are likely to survive.

triage

sorting of patients from a disaster to establish priorities and allocation to special services. See also A CRASH PLAN.

triage nurse
a nurse trained in triage procedures.
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, it is important that Level 3 patients be seated in the immediate vicinity of the triage station, as is done in our CPETS procedure, so that if their conditions worsen, the triage nurse is immediately accessible to update their level designation and expedite delivery of lifesaving treatments.
GOAL 4: Expand the electronic clinical information system so that all clinicians and triage nurses have access to patient records and can enter data and have access to available clinician time for patient visits.
Another paramedic said: "You take a patient to A&E and wait to hand them over to a triage nurse who decides what priority the patient is.
By correctly identifying presenting patient conditions and initiating necessary and appropriate interventions in a timely manner, triage nurses serve as the eyes and ears of the acute care system.
The triage nurse is the first in a line of many people who will ask you, "What brought you to the ER today?
An infant that arrives with fast breathing and is judged by the triage nurse to have a dusky tongue would be immediately taken to the resuscitation room and treated per problem, e.
Feeling of perceived prejudice may also aggravate aggression and may lead to a risk of harm for the triage nurse and other reception staff.
A triage nurse is then able to make critical medical decisions that can positively impact the patient's care, as well as claims costs and outcomes.
The area should allow each individual adequate working space with the physician area close enough to the triage nurse to be able to provide support when necessary.
Additionally, on every visit, when the triage nurse triaged the patient, the nurse was trained to ask whether the patient had received the flu vaccine.
A special thanks to nurses Sarah and Julie, aides Judy and Cookie, and Tracey the triage nurse who offered advice and compassion whenever a question arose.
He had told the triage nurse on initial presentation that he was allergic to penicillin, but the hospitalist subsequently administered ampicillin.