triage


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triage

 [tre-ahzh´] (Fr.)
the sorting out and classification of casualties of war or other disaster, to determine priority of need and proper place of treatment.
disaster triage in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as establishing priorities of patient care for urgent treatment while allocating scarce resources.
triage: emergency center in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as establishing priorities and initiating treatment for patients in an emergency center.
triage: telephone in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as determining the nature and urgency of a problem or problems and providing directions for the level of care required, over the telephone. See also telehealth.

tri·age

(trē'ahzh),
1. Medical screening of patients to determine their relative priority for treatment order.
2. The separation of a large number of casualties, in military or civilian disaster medical care, into three groups: those who cannot be expected to survive even with treatment; those who will recover without treatment; and the highest priority group, those who will not survive without treatment.
[Fr. sorting]

triage

/tri·age/ (tre-ahzh´) [Fr.]
1. the sorting out of casualties of war or other disaster to determine priority of need and proper place of treatment.
2. by extension, the sorting and prioritizing of nonemergency patients for treatment.

triage

(trē-äzh′, trē′äzh′)
n.
A process for sorting injured people into groups based on their need for or likely benefit from immediate medical treatment. Triage is used in hospital emergency rooms, on battlefields, and at disaster sites when limited medical resources must be allocated.
tr.v. tri·aged, tri·aging, tri·ages
To sort or allocate by triage: triaged the patients according to their symptoms.

triage

[trē·äzh′]
Etymology: Fr, trier, to sort out
1 in military medicine, a classification of casualties of war and other disasters according to the gravity of injuries, urgency of treatment, and place for treatment.
2 a process in which a group of patients is sorted according to their need for care. The kind of illness or injury, the severity of the problem, and the facilities available govern the process, as in a hospital emergency department.
3 in disaster medicine, a process in which a large group of patients is sorted so that care can be concentrated on those who are likely to survive.

triage

The sorting of patients in A&E according to urgency, separating them in the first instance into majors (immediate, urgent) and minors (standard, non-urgent).

triage

triage, French, sorting Emergency medicine A method of ranking sick or injured people according to the severity of their sickness or injury in order to ensure that medical and nursing staff facilities are used most efficiently; assessment of injury intensity and the immediacy or urgency for medical attention. See Streamlined review.
Triage priorities
Highest priority Respiratory, facial, neck, chest, cardiovascular, hemorrhage, neck injuries
Very high priority Shock, retroperitoneal or intraperitoneal hemorrhage
High priority Cranial, cerebral, spinal cord, burns
Low priority Lower genitourinary tract, peripheral nerves and vessels, splinted fractures, soft tissue lesions

tri·age

(trē'ahzh)
Medical screening of patients to determine their relative priority for treatment; the separation of a large number of casualties, in military or civilian disaster medical care, into three groups: 1) those who cannot be expected to survive even with treatment; 2) those who will recover without treatment; 3) the highest priority group, those who will not survive without treatment.
[Fr. sorting]

triage

A selection process, used in war or disaster, to divide casualties into three groups so as to maximize resources and avoid wastage of essential surgical skills on hopeless cases. In triage, an experienced surgeon sorts cases rapidly into those needing urgent treatment, those that will survive without immediate treatment, and those beyond hope of benefit from treatment. Triage is also used to assign treatment in the event of the appearance of a number of men suffering acute chest pain.

triage

screening to prioritize need and locate patient to the most beneficial treatment

triage (trēˑ·äj),

n a process of sorting a group of patients in a hospital or military or disaster setting to determine the immediacy of an individual's need for treatment. The type of injury or illness, the condition's severity, the level of urgency involved, the availability of medical facilities, and the likelihood of survival are the criteria used in triage.

tri·age

(trē'ahzh)
1. Medical screening of patients to determine their relative priority for treatment.
2. Separation of a large number of casualties, in military or civilian disaster medical care, into three groups: those who cannot be expected to survive even with treatment; those who will recover without treatment; and the highest priority, those who will not survive without treatment.
[Fr. sorting]

triage (trēäzh´),

n 1. (in military medicine) a classification of casualties of war and other disasters according to the gravity of injuries, urgency of treatment, and place for treatment.
2. a process in which a group of patients is sorted according to need for care. The kind of illness or injury, severity of the problem, and facilities available govern the process, as in the emergency room of a hospital.
3. (in disaster medicine) a process in which a large group of patients is sorted so that care may be concentrated on those who are likely to survive.

triage

sorting of patients from a disaster to establish priorities and allocation to special services. See also A CRASH PLAN.

triage nurse
a nurse trained in triage procedures.
References in periodicals archive ?
Quidel will acquire the Triage business, including real estate for the San Diego Triage facilities, and the BNP business for a total consideration of USD 400m plus USD 40m in contingent consideration.
The Emergency Nurses' Association (ENA) anticipates that the triage nurse has an experience of at least 6 months in ED, completed training and course programs about triage, and has an emergency certificate (8, 17).
The study was conducted in January-March 2015, with voluntary participation of 33 workers out of 42, who were providing healthcare services in the emergency department at Rize Recep Tayyip Erdogan University and Erzincan University Medical Faculties, working in collaboration with hospitals run by the Ministry of Health, following triage training of the trainees, which had been organized by the Turkish Ministry of Health, Public Hospitals Institution, Division of International Relationships and Emergency Health Services.
Briefly, triage Level 1, 2, and 3 patients are directed to waiting area A, near the triage nurse station, and triage Level 4 and 5 patients are directed to waiting area B.
5%) participants said simple triage and rapid treatment (START) scale was more significant than ethical principles, 156(36.
Chief Inspector Sean Russell, who leads the Street Triage initiative for the force, said: "We have seen a 51 per cent reduction in the number of people detained.
The pre-claim triage partner should operate a Utilization Review Accreditation Commission accredited 24/7 call center staffed by registered nurses, which is a nationally recognized accreditation validating an organization's commitment to quality and accountability in healthcare; and
is hoping to have the Mobile Triage Device in full production and available to the public within the very near future.
Triage knowledge among nurses is one of the key elements of supervision in emergency department, if it is not carried out at standard level; the outcomes of clinical care of patients and efficiency of emergency departments get compromised.
In the medical office, triage frequently starts with an automated answering device phone message.
Emergency triage is a process of rapidly sorting patients into groups based on the urgency of their condition.