triage


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triage

 [tre-ahzh´] (Fr.)
the sorting out and classification of casualties of war or other disaster, to determine priority of need and proper place of treatment.
disaster triage in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as establishing priorities of patient care for urgent treatment while allocating scarce resources.
triage: emergency center in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as establishing priorities and initiating treatment for patients in an emergency center.
triage: telephone in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as determining the nature and urgency of a problem or problems and providing directions for the level of care required, over the telephone. See also telehealth.

tri·age

(trē'ahzh),
1. Medical screening of patients to determine their relative priority for treatment order.
2. The separation of a large number of casualties, in military or civilian disaster medical care, into three groups: those who cannot be expected to survive even with treatment; those who will recover without treatment; and the highest priority group, those who will not survive without treatment.
[Fr. sorting]

triage

(trē-äzh′, trē′äzh′)
n.
A process for sorting injured people into groups based on their need for or likely benefit from immediate medical treatment. Triage is used in hospital emergency rooms, on battlefields, and at disaster sites when limited medical resources must be allocated.
tr.v. tri·aged, tri·aging, tri·ages
To sort or allocate by triage: triaged the patients according to their symptoms.

triage

The sorting of patients in A&E according to urgency, separating them in the first instance into majors (immediate, urgent) and minors (standard, non-urgent).

triage

triage, French, sorting Emergency medicine A method of ranking sick or injured people according to the severity of their sickness or injury in order to ensure that medical and nursing staff facilities are used most efficiently; assessment of injury intensity and the immediacy or urgency for medical attention. See Streamlined review.
Triage priorities
Highest priority Respiratory, facial, neck, chest, cardiovascular, hemorrhage, neck injuries
Very high priority Shock, retroperitoneal or intraperitoneal hemorrhage
High priority Cranial, cerebral, spinal cord, burns
Low priority Lower genitourinary tract, peripheral nerves and vessels, splinted fractures, soft tissue lesions

tri·age

(trē'ahzh)
Medical screening of patients to determine their relative priority for treatment; the separation of a large number of casualties, in military or civilian disaster medical care, into three groups: 1) those who cannot be expected to survive even with treatment; 2) those who will recover without treatment; 3) the highest priority group, those who will not survive without treatment.
[Fr. sorting]

triage

A selection process, used in war or disaster, to divide casualties into three groups so as to maximize resources and avoid wastage of essential surgical skills on hopeless cases. In triage, an experienced surgeon sorts cases rapidly into those needing urgent treatment, those that will survive without immediate treatment, and those beyond hope of benefit from treatment. Triage is also used to assign treatment in the event of the appearance of a number of men suffering acute chest pain.

tri·age

(trē'ahzh)
1. Medical screening of patients to determine their relative priority for treatment.
2. Separation of a large number of casualties, in military or civilian disaster medical care, into three groups: those who cannot be expected to survive even with treatment; those who will recover without treatment; and the highest priority, those who will not survive without treatment.
[Fr. sorting]
References in periodicals archive ?
The reason I came to street triage is because of the positive effect it has on both services.
In emergency medical practice, the most direct application of distributive justice is in triage (16).
Low specificity of statistical analysis can be explained by the NPs, involved in triage of the patients, being more likely to refer the patients to the office before making a definitive decision that the patients were not surgical candidates.
Of the 7 899 patient folders analysed, the corrected triage acuity breakdown of the sample, after evaluation by the senior clinician, was as follows: red 1 275 (16.1%), orange 1 882 (23.8%), yellow 2 691 (34.1%) and green 1 709 (21.7%); triage data were missing in 342 cases (4.3%).
A total of 428 different guidelines were used for patient triage. The five most common individual guidelines were pediatric vomiting (4.3 percent), medication questions in an adult (3.7 percent), pediatric fever (3.0 percent), abdominal pain or discomfort (2.9 percent), and "seen doctor/health care provider" (2.6 percent).
A Kruskal-Wallis test was conducted to evaluate differences among the median waiting times of the four triage categories.
The ESI is based on four decision points regarding patient acuity and resource needs, in order to sort the patients into five triage levels.
Como se aprecia en la figura 1, en ciertas etapas de este flujo se presentan tiempos de espera, como en la admision, el triage, la atencion o el egreso, donde pueden generarse colas, que de ser muy extensas pueden dar lugar a abandonos y a la insatisfaccion del paciente.
The revised agreement reflects Quidel's direct commercial responsibility for all Beckman Coulter BNP sales globally, while the business arrangement for the pending acquisition of Alere's Triage MeterPro assets is substantially unchanged
TriageLogic is a provider of top-quality triage technology, mobile applications, and call center solutions.
To the Editor: We read with interest Goldstein et al.'s [1] article, 'The accuracy of nurse performance of the triage process in a tertiary hospital emergency department in Gauteng Province, South Africa (SA)'.
Kondo et al, en su estudio con 13463 historias clinicas de pacientes que consultaron al servicio de urgencias de Centros de Trauma en 114 Hospitales en Japon, con el fin de realizar un analisis comparativo de la Escala Revisada del Trauma RTS, la puntuacion del Triage T-RTS, la Escala de Severidad de Lesiones y Trauma TRISS, y el sistema de puntuacion modificado GAP (Escala de coma de Glasgow, Edad y Presion arterial sistolica), concluyeron acerca de las dificultades que existen en los servicios de urgencias para la aplicacion de estas escalas tales como RTS la cual requiere calculos complejos.