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triad

 [tri´ad]
1. an element with a valence of three.
2. a group of three similar bodies, or a complex composed of three items or units.
acute compression triad Beck's triad.
Andersen's triad Andersen's syndrome.
Beck's triad rising venous pressure, falling arterial pressure, and small quiet heart; characteristic of cardiac compression; called also acute compression triad.
Cushing's triad decreased pulse, increased blood pressure, and a widening pulse pressure associated with increased intracranial pressure; it is a late clinical sign and may indicate brainstem herniation.
Hutchinson's triad diffuse interstitial keratitis, labyrinthine disease, and Hutchinson's teeth, seen in congenital syphilis.
Saint's triad hiatus hernia, colonic diverticula, and cholelithiasis.

tri·ad

(trī'ad),
1. A collection of three things having something in common.
2. The transverse tubule and the terminal cisternae on each side of it in skeletal muscle fibers.
3. Synonym(s): portal triad
4. The father, mother, and child relationship projectively experienced in group psychotherapy.
[G. trias (triad-), the number 3, fr. treis, three]

triad

Medspeak
A trilogy of clinical or pathologic findings, first described as typical for a particular disease but which often prove nonspecific.

Sexology
Three people, two of one sex and one of the other, in a continuing relationship of emotional and sexual involvement; i.e., a threesome with an emotional component.

triad

A trilogy of clinical or pathologic findings, first described as typical for
a particular disease, which often prove to be nonspecific. See Asthma triad, Autonomic triad, Behçet's triad, Carney's triad, Christian's triad, Charcot's triad, Epidemiologic triad, Female athlete triad, Hemochromatosis triad, Lennox's triad, Negative triad, Petit's triad, Renal cell carcinoma triad, Saint's triad, Somatostatinoma triad, Toxoplasmosis triad, Trotter's triad, Virchow's triad, Waterhouse-Friderichsen triad, Whipple's triad, Wilson's triad.

tri·ad

(trī'ad)
1. A group of three things with something in common.
2. The transverse tubule and the terminal cisternae on each side of it in skeletal muscle fibers.
3. Synonym(s): portal triad.
4. psychology/psychiatry The father-mother-child relationship projectively experienced in group psychotherapy.
[G. trias (triad-), the number 3, fr. treis, three]

tri·ad

(trī'ad)
1. A collection of three things with something in common.
2. The transverse tubule and the terminal cisternae on each side of it in skeletal muscle fibers.
[G. trias (triad-), the number 3, fr. treis, three]
References in periodicals archive ?
A typical format for skills training is the triadic model described in this study.
Since case-marking governed by transitive verbs differs at two points from that governed by intransitive verbs (as opposed to the nominative and the ergative constructions), the marking of transitivity is redundant in triadic languages.
This new triadic instrument, being two dimensional, does not allow circularity, an artifact of using one dimensional analysis (paired comparisons) to study essentially two dimensional situations (three-way comparisons).
Triadic Interaction Assessment: During 15 minutes of each session, the participant was observed while interacting with a parent and a consistent set of objects (mostly toys).
It is, he writes, Percy's "most thoroughly Peircean novel," the one in which "Percy's triadic sign relations and their widest spiritual implications receive their most achieved expression in fictional form." Desmond shows how Percy aims at a "recovery of Christianity" without resort to a Christian language and practice emptied of meaning in an age of scientism.
The main objectives of this study are (a) to identify the frequency of concordance/discordance on home environment factors (e.g., parental encouragement to diet, family functioning) among adolescents, mothers, and fathers; and (b) to examine the relationship between triadic concordance/discordance on home environment variables and adolescent disordered eating behaviors.
triadic relation to a Second, called its Object, as to be capable of
Sigmund Freud (1905) referred to evidence of psychopathology related to these triadic elements when he hypothesized the relationships between and among fire setting, enuresis, and sexual problems (Heath, Hardesty,& Goldfine, 1984).
For instance, a split-primary palette or other triadic harmonies could become lessons for students.
This "win-win-lose" configuration is denoted as a "triadic exchange," which tends to become more prevalent as the public sector expands.
In this lack of knowledge, only a few studies have addressed the assessment of triadic interactions in families with preterm children [36, 40, 41].