trephination


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

trephination

 [tref€´€ĭ-na´shun]
use of the trephine for creating an opening in the skull or in the sclera.
dental trephination surgical creation of a fistula by puncturing the soft tissue and bone overlying the root apex to provide drainage. Called also apicostomy.

treph·i·na·tion

(tref'i-nā'shŭn),
Removal of a circular piece ("button") of cranium by a trephine.
Synonym(s): trepanation

treph·i·na·tion

(tref'i-nā'shŭn)
Removal of a circular piece ("button") of cranium by a trephine.

treph·i·na·tion

(tref'i-nā'shŭn)
Removal of a circular piece of cranium by a trephine.
References in periodicals archive ?
No treatment was pursued at that time, pending a planned sinus trephination and sinoscopy.
Duart et al., "VEGF, BMP-7, Matrigel[TM], hyaluronic acid, in vitro cultured chondrocytes and trephination for healing of the avascular portion of the meniscus.
In the researchers' analysis, skull surgery, or trephination, occurred on seven of 23 Inca individuals who suffered major cranial trauma, most likely due to warfare, and on 21 of 77 individuals who had minor, healed cranial injuries.
Mucopurulent fluid was drained through incision made in the fluctuent swelling by surgical blade #11 and bone trephination. When drainage ceased, rubber dam drain was sutured and canals were prepared 1 mm short of the radiographic apices with size 15-60 K-files using a step-back technique.
Zheng and associates (21) utilized a goat model of meniscal tears repaired with suture to examine the effect of trephination. They found that suture alone of avascular zone tears resulted in poor healing.
Comparison of pulpectomy alone versus pulpectomy with trephination for the relief pain.
In a skull dating from 5000 BC, there is evidence of trephination: a hole cut through the skull.
The most successful "new civilization" managed to bag hospitals, habeas corpus, and trephination (Incan brain surgery).
1976 Are supra-inion depressions evidence of prophylactic trephination? Bulletin of History of Medicine 50:414-434.