trepanation


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trephination

 [tref€´€ĭ-na´shun]
use of the trephine for creating an opening in the skull or in the sclera.
dental trephination surgical creation of a fistula by puncturing the soft tissue and bone overlying the root apex to provide drainage. Called also apicostomy.

treph·i·na·tion

(tref'i-nā'shŭn),
Removal of a circular piece ("button") of cranium by a trephine.
Synonym(s): trepanation

treph·i·na·tion

(tref'i-nā'shŭn)
Removal of a circular piece of cranium by a trephine.
References in periodicals archive ?
MACHADO & SILVA (2013) carried out an 8mm trepanation to compare rigid and a flexible sinuscopy in horses, using a 4mm 30[degrees] rigid endoscope and a flexible endoscope 4.8mm in diameter.
There is no doubt that trepanation is one of the oldest surgical procedures, as well as the oldest neurosurgical intervention made by humans (1).
They also realized that larger-sized trepanations were less likely to be as successful as smaller ones.
One female with a layer of bone that had regrown from the inside border of a trepanation hole died between ages 14 and 16, suggesting her skull surgery had occurred as young as age 10, the researchers estimate.
It has a 45 millimetre by 30 millimetre hole in the top made by a procedure known as trepanation, where a portion of the bone was removed from a living and most-likely conscious patient.
As she makes her way to the coast, Yolande is taken in by Lukas, a retired lawyer plagued by depression who is bent on emulating the woman and achieving a permanent high by means of a self-inflicted trepanation. In one of several scenes fit for a theater of the absurd, he sends Yolande to an abattoir in search of a bovine head on which to practice this ancient procedure.
Trepanation was said to be used in the treatment of eclampsia - a hypertensive pregnancy disorder.
In a multifaceted bioarchaeological approach, Kurin investigated rates of violence, trepanation, isotope ratios, nonmetric cranial traits, cranial modification, and negative health indicators within the context of Wari imperial collapse and the emergence of the Chanka society (Peruvian Andes, A.D.
warren.manger@mirror.co.uk 1 HOLE IN HEAD Brit artist Amanda Feilding once performed a trepanation on herself, drilling a hole in her skull, as part of a short art film entitled Heartbeat Of The Brain.
From ancient blades used to cut holes in a patient's skull (a still-mysterious procedure called trepanation) to the modern devices used to remove blockages from blood vessels, this Chicago museum provides a fascinating historical tour of surgical technology.