trench foot


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Related to trench foot: immersion foot

im·mer·sion foot

a condition resulting from prolonged exposure to damp and cold; the extremity is initially cold and anesthetic, but on rewarming becomes hyperemic, paresthetic, and hyperhidrotic; recovery is often slow.
Synonym(s): trench foot
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

trench foot

n.
A condition of the foot resembling frostbite, caused by prolonged exposure to cold and dampness and often affecting soldiers in trenches.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
A condition described in World War I in soldiers in the trenches, whose feet were damp and exposed to near-freezing temperatures for prolonged periods, which caused acral vasoconstriction and heat loss; the resulting ischaemia unchains a vicious cycle of necrosis, endothelial damage, intravascular ‘sludging’ of cells, extravasation of protein and fluid, resulting in increased ischaemia; the prolonged cold is followed by vasodilation, burning pain and paresthesiae with formation of haemorrhagic blebs or gangrene, accompanied by cellulitis, lymphangitis, swelling, thrombophlebitis, and persistent hypersensitivity to cold with secondary Raynaud phenomenon
Management Slow warming of foot; if the tissue is warmed too rapidly, reactive hyperthermia, blistering and possibly thrombosis
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

trench foot

A condition described in World War I in soldiers in the trenches, whose feet were damp and exposed to near-freezing temperatures for prolonged periods, which caused acral vasoconstriction and heat loss; the
prolonged cold is followed by vasodilation, burning pain and paresthesiae with formation of hemorrhagic blebs or gangrene, accompanied by cellulitis, lymphangitis, swelling, thrombophlebitis, and persistent hypersensitivity to cold with 2º Raynaud's phenomenon Management Slow warming of foot. See Immersion foot.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

trench foot

See IMMERSION FOOT.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
He said he believed Mr Bullimore could have trench foot, which is caused by prolonged exposure to non- freezing cold water.
"Trench fever, trench foot and trench nephritis were the three big trench diseases.
By the end of the century sea levels will have risen by as much as a lot less than a metre and civilisation is likely to be ended by trench foot.
While he lost many of his good friends in the war, Tolkien survived as he endured a series of maladies including trench foot and trench fever which left him severely debilitated and eventually led to him being invalided out of the war in 1916.
" I got trench foot. The soldiers use to get it all the time," he said.
* NO THANKS : Feet in the early stages of trench foot, delirious from insomnia and malnutrition and queuing for the loo.
But who knows what adventures lies ahead for me in life?" During the Amazon jungle marathon 18 months ago she lost all of her toenails and suffered trench foot, finishing the race in a top 10 position.
My abiding memory, thanks to the trench foot I'm still being treated for, is braving the ankle-deep mud and bullet rain while 20 kids chased a caseball.
YOU might get trench foot in the flip-flops, but officially it's still summer, so try to catch a few rays in between bands in this Soul Cal cami top, pounds 19.99, and beach rip hotpants, pounds 22.99, from Republic.
There was more chance of the chasers getting trench foot than being dazzled.
In November 2004 while training on Dartmoor he got trench foot - a painful injury which damages nerves in the legs and feet, caused by cold and insanitary conditions.
There were the trench-foot patients under their power and unmounted crying, "Gangway, I am a trench foot" as they headed for shelter.