trench foot


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Related to trench foot: immersion foot

im·mer·sion foot

a condition resulting from prolonged exposure to damp and cold; the extremity is initially cold and anesthetic, but on rewarming becomes hyperemic, paresthetic, and hyperhidrotic; recovery is often slow.
Synonym(s): trench foot

trench foot

n.
A condition of the foot resembling frostbite, caused by prolonged exposure to cold and dampness and often affecting soldiers in trenches.

trench foot

Etymology: OFr, trenchier, to cut; AS, fot
a condition of moist gangrene of the foot caused by the freezing of wet skin.
A condition described in World War I in soldiers in the trenches, whose feet were damp and exposed to near-freezing temperatures for prolonged periods, which caused acral vasoconstriction and heat loss; the resulting ischaemia unchains a vicious cycle of necrosis, endothelial damage, intravascular ‘sludging’ of cells, extravasation of protein and fluid, resulting in increased ischaemia; the prolonged cold is followed by vasodilation, burning pain and paresthesiae with formation of haemorrhagic blebs or gangrene, accompanied by cellulitis, lymphangitis, swelling, thrombophlebitis, and persistent hypersensitivity to cold with secondary Raynaud phenomenon
Management Slow warming of foot; if the tissue is warmed too rapidly, reactive hyperthermia, blistering and possibly thrombosis

trench foot

A condition described in World War I in soldiers in the trenches, whose feet were damp and exposed to near-freezing temperatures for prolonged periods, which caused acral vasoconstriction and heat loss; the
prolonged cold is followed by vasodilation, burning pain and paresthesiae with formation of hemorrhagic blebs or gangrene, accompanied by cellulitis, lymphangitis, swelling, thrombophlebitis, and persistent hypersensitivity to cold with 2º Raynaud's phenomenon Management Slow warming of foot. See Immersion foot.

trench foot

See IMMERSION FOOT.

immersion foot

; trench foot skin maceration, and overall deterioration of skin integrity and function due to prolonged immersion; cold-water immersion causes reduced perfusion of superficial tissues, mottling/pallor, numbness, ulceration and even ischaemic gangrene; warm-water immersion causes painful maceration, with blisters and superficial opportunistic infections
References in periodicals archive ?
Specialist Dr Howard Oakely diagnosed a "gross" case of nonfreezing cold injury - trench foot - and wrote in his medical report: "I am very concerned that he appears to have been deterred from seeking medical attention and has suffered from pain for over a year.
Trench fever, trench foot and trench nephritis were the three big trench diseases.
There was more chance of the chasers getting trench foot than being dazzled.
Louisa Swanston, 28, contracted trench foot, a common First World War complaint, while serving in Bosnia.
While recovering from trench foot in English hospitals, I completed an all-time record number of USAFI [US Armed Forces Institute] correspondence courses--20 in 15 months, later depicted in Robert L.
A Salvationist, a trained nurse, knelt on the grass verge to wash the feet of anyone suffering from trench foot, one of the ailments that affect the poorly shod.
The sodden earth and poor footwear led to trench foot, which rotted the skin, and the insanitary conditions provided breeding grounds for germs and trench fever, which induced headaches, skin rashes, leg pains and inflammation of the eyes.
Clearly there were many soldiers who received serious injuries as a result of direct conict but trench foot and trench fever were also serious enough to result in removal from front-line service.
Isabel Crame, 13, looked into the issue of trench foot.
So if you live in a house with a resident duck population expect trench foot.
Like trench foot for a First World War private, it goes with the job.
We've gone on holiday by mistake" is a phrase that can make me laugh even at 8am on a damp campsite when trench foot is threatening to ruin the pedicure I had before I left.