tremulous

(redirected from tremulously)
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Related to tremulously: adversely, diffidently, mutinously

tremulous

 [trem´u-lus]
shaking, trembling, or quivering.

trem·u·lous

(trem'yū-lŭs),
Characterized by tremor.

trem·u·lous

(trem'yū-lŭs)
Characterized by tremor.
References in classic literature ?
Gradually Alexander joined; between them, whether he would or no, they forced a word or two from John; and these fell so tremulously, and spoke so eloquently of a mind oppressed with dread, that Mr.
Its little leaves were hanging tremulously, not yet so fully blown as to hide its development of bough and twig, making poetry against the spiritual tints of a spring sunset.
"I have two children who come home at 4, and I don't want them to get hurt," one woman tremulously explains in her message.
Roy has written memorably of how, in the 1930s, he had waited tremulously every evening for Moscow Radio to broadcast Communism's call-to-the-barricades--the 'Internationale.'
Certain pages in Fialho or in Chateaubriand make life tingle in my veins, make me quietly, tremulously mad with an unattainable pleasure already mine."
A graffiti artist of mixed heritage, Dene tremulously applies for--and receives--a grant to collect the oral histories of Oakland's Native people.
Notice how tremulously, almost how devoutly, they say the word love, not so much pleading an 'extenuating circumstance' as appealing to an authority" (The Four Loves, 136).
And thankfully, so did the cast: with Mary Elizabeth Williams's luminous, tremulously sincere Leonora as the deeply affecting centre around which the drama coalesced.
Her own impulse is to challenge this credo, that bad fortune is proof of bad character: "'But,' said she tremulously, 'suppose your sin was not of your own seeking?'" (62).
Clara (Karla Doorbar perfectly cast as a young girl in a dream state) descends the dark staircase tremulously searching for her nutcracker doll.
A note on the newsroom bulletin board from Peter Binzen, metropolitan editor, invited one and all to provide him with ideas for "enterprise stories." I vividly recall tremulously typing up--yes, we had only typewriters back then--a list of more than a dozen story ideas.
Could it be, the nation asked tremulously, OK for men to cry?