tree nut


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tree nut

n.
Any of various edible dried fruits or seeds of nonleguminous woody plants. Tree nuts include almonds, walnuts, cashews, pine nuts, and sometimes coconuts, but not peanuts, soybeans, or sunflower seeds.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

tree nut

Any of several nuts, e.g., almonds, cashews, filberts or pecans that grow on shrubs or trees. They are among the most common sources of food allergy.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
The oils extracted from tree nuts such as almond oil, walnut oil and others are being extensively used in cosmetic industry for making various skincare products such as creams, lotions and others.
Researchers at Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy conducted a review and meta-analysis of 61 trials to investigate the effects of tree nuts on blood lipids, lipoproteins, blood pressure, and inflammation in adults 18 years and older without cardiovascular disease.
The tocopherol contents of ground and tree nuts were significantly affected during storage period of 12 weeks.
In any case, after controlling for patients having never tried each food allergen, age, gender, parents' asthma diagnosis, pollen allergy, and maternal education level, there was a significantly higher prevalence of asthma for peanut and tree nut allergy, as well as for pet allergy, pollen allergy, and eczema.
Although not all allergies are lifelong, people who have allergic reactions to peanuts and tree nuts are often considered to have them throughout life.
Tree nut sensitivity was discovered in eight of the children with peanut sensitivity and in another two children, note Syed M.
Tree nuts: Tree nut consumption increased in 2002/03 to set a record for the second year in a row.
Sicherer of Mount Sinai School of Medicine and his associates had previously conducted a telephone survey of over 4,000 households to determine the prevalence of peanut and tree nut allergy in 1997, and in this investigation they repeated the survey in 2002 for comparison.
While peanuts often get the largest share of public scrutiny in the battle to combat food allergies, the study found that seafood allergies affect approximately 6.5 million people--more than double the three million people who have a peanut or tree nut allergy.
Vadas, Wai, Burks, and Perelman (2001) found that peanut protein was secreted into breast milk of lactating women after maternal ingestion in half the women studied providing occult exposure to peanut protein, in one study of 122 children with peanut and tree nut allergies, 83% of the children were breast fed, and greater than 90% of the mothers had ingested peanuts and at least one tree nut during lactation (Sicherer et al., 1998).
Moroccan-Spiced Tree Nut Couscous (Makes 4 servings) 1 1/2 teaspoons olive oil 1/2 cup couscous 1 cup water 1/2 cup lightly toasted mixed tree nuts (almonds, cashews, hazelnuts, pecans, or pine nuts) 1/2 cup raisins 1/3 cup red bell pepper, chopped 1/4 cup each: chopped fresh Italian parsley and mint 1 1/2 teaspoons each: ground cinnamon and cumin 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
This nut has become, within a few years, the most popular tree nut for snack purposes in the United Kingdom.