travel

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travel

[ME. travailen, to travail, to journey]
1. To move from place to place, e.g., from one country to another.
2. The act of moving among different places or countries. Travel to some locations presents health risks, such as deep venous thrombosis, diarrhea, geographically specific infections (e.g., malaria), injury, insomnia, rashes, colds, and influenza.
References in classic literature ?
When the spring stirs my blood With the instinct to travel, I can get enough gravel On the Old Marlborough Road.
said the Jew, ``he will not let me travel in his train Saxon or Norman will be equally ashamed of the poor Israelite; and to travel by myself through the domains of Philip de Malvoisin and Reginald Front-de-B
My maid," said Gertrude hesitating; for she had not intended to travel so expensively.
He said to him, 'Will you be my servant and travel with me?
Thanks to this Gascon toilet, I could hope that the lady would not take me for the local rate collector; but now when my thoughts travel back to that episode of my youth, I sometimes laugh at my own expense.
Art and life seem to me intensely serious things, and in our travels in Europe we should especially remember the immense seriousness of Art.
He was dreadfully tired of living all alone in the woods and wanted to travel and see people.
Yes, there is a man with one eye who has gone by and who travels fast.
Travel by mules and ox-carts is slow and sure, but the roads are very bad, as I have heard from friends who have made explorations in Honduras.
You may not travel through my lands," said the King.
From which I am inclined to think that the sage magician who is my friend, and watches over my interests (for of necessity there is and must be one, or else I should not be a right knight-errant), that this same, I say, must have helped thee to travel without thy knowledge; for some of these sages will catch up a knight-errant sleeping in his bed, and without his knowing how or in what way it happened, he wakes up the next day more than a thousand leagues away from the place where he went to sleep.
The greatest minds, as they are capable of the highest excellences, are open likewise to the greatest aberrations; and those who travel very slowly may yet make far greater progress, provided they keep always to the straight road, than those who, while they run, forsake it.