travel


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travel

[ME. travailen, to travail, to journey]
1. To move from place to place, e.g., from one country to another.
2. The act of moving among different places or countries. Travel to some locations presents health risks, such as deep venous thrombosis, diarrhea, geographically specific infections (e.g., malaria), injury, insomnia, rashes, colds, and influenza.
References in classic literature ?
The younger Michaux, in his Travels West of the Alleghanies in
Yes, to travel with a courier is bliss, to travel without one is the reverse.
I know likewise, that writers of travels, like dictionary-makers, are sunk into oblivion by the weight and bulk of those who come last, and therefore lie uppermost.
Oh, go with me,' said the man; 'if we four are together we shall easily travel through the wide world.
Occasionally he fell in with Akut and his tribe, hunting with them for a day or two; or he might travel to the hill country where the baboons had come to accept him as a matter of course; but most of all was he with Tantor, the elephant--the great gray battle ship of the jungle--the super-dreadnaught of his savage world.
One might travel back and verify the accepted account of the Battle of Hastings, for instance
It is thought by some that, after death, they will have to travel to these mountains and ascend one of their highest and most rugged peaks, among rocks and snows and tumbling torrents.
Art and life seem to me intensely serious things, and in our travels in Europe we should especially remember the immense seriousness of Art.
He cursed his fate because he had no money to travel, and he knew his uncle would not send him more than the fifteen pounds a month which had been agreed upon.
He raged and swore like any layman, but as his swearing mended nothing and the landlord could not aid him, and as, moreover, he was forced to be at Emmet Priory that very morning upon matters of business, he was fain either to don the cobbler's clothes or travel the road in nakedness.
I am very sorry to have made you travel so far," said he.
Yet it was not the excitement of the fiction that I dreaded, for I consumed great numbers of narratives of travel, and was not in the least troubled by hairbreadth escapes, or shipwrecks, or perils from wild beasts or deadly serpents; it was the dramatic effect contrived by the playwright or novelist, and worked up to in the speech of his characters that I could not bear.