traumatic tap

traumatic tap

A diagnostic lumbar puncture in which there is incidental hemorrhage due to violent Pt movement or tearing of vessels, a risk inherent in the procedure; TTs are differentiated from subarachnoid hemorrhage by absence of xanthochromia, ↓ RBCs in serial tubes, rapid coagulation
References in periodicals archive ?
A red color is consistent with a traumatic tap (specimen has clots) or malignancy (non-traumatic tap has no clots).
The second common presentation was blood-tinged effusion caused by traumatic tap or due to thickened pleura.
This was not secondary to a traumatic tap as most of the cells were plasma cells and the differential in the peripheral blood was quite different as described below.
Define gross findings that distinguish a traumatic tap from a pathologic bleed when a bloody CSF is encountered.
Ignore the RBC count in the CSF; it represents a traumatic tap, not an increased risk of HSV.
Additionally, the surveillance officer reviewed admissions for the previous 24 h and reported patients having any one of five clinical syndromes (acute respiratory failure with pleural effusion; hemorrhagic enteritis with fever; a skin lesion characterized by vesicles, ulcer, or eschar; meningitis, encephalitis, or unexplained acute encephalopathy; or anthrax or suspected anthrax infection) and a widened mediastinum on chest radiograph or laboratory findings of a gram-positive bacillus on Gram stain, Bacillus species from culture of a sterile site specimen, or hemorrhagic cerebrospinal fluid, pleural, or peritoneal fluid in patients without a traumatic tap or event.
14,15) To complicate matters further, there is no generally accepted threshold number for what constitutes a traumatic tap.
The practice of using tubes #1 and #4 for counts has become fairly common, as this aids the clinician in determining if the cells come from a traumatic tap or are actually a problem with the CSF.
They always indicate the attempt of the body to rid a space of RBCs but in CSF they are indications of a pathologic bleed instead of a traumatic tap because the blood would have to be in the CNS for at least 24 hours.
A While the accepted standard for CSF cell counts is to use tube 3 or 4, some clinicians find it helpful to perform additional testing to determine if the RBCs present are the result of a traumatic tap or from an actual central nervous system bleed.
Since traumatic lumbar punctures are fairly common with an estimated incidence of about 10% to 20%, (2) the clinical laboratory routinely needs to try to differentiate a subarachnoid hemorrhage from a traumatic tap.
Krieg lists many causes, including red cell lysis, either due to spontaneous bleeding or lysis of red cells due to a delay in examining CSF containing red cells from a traumatic tap.