traumatic neurosis

trau·mat·ic neu·ro·sis

any functional nervous disorder after an accident or injury. See: posttraumatic stress disorder.

trau·mat·ic neu·ro·sis

(traw-mat'ik nūr-ō'sis)
Any functional nervous disorder following an accident or injury.
See also: posttraumatic stress disorder
References in periodicals archive ?
Jean-Martin Charcot referred to these memories as "mental parasites," and this conception recurs in the writings of Pierre Janet and Sigmund Freud on traumatic neurosis and traumatic neurasthenia.
Douglas Kelley, "The Use of General Semantics and Korzybskian Principles as an Extensional Method of Group Psychotherapy in Traumatic Neurosis," in General Semantics and Psychotherapy, Isabel Caro and Charlotte Schuchardt Read, eds.
According to Sigmund Freud in "Beyond the Pleasure Principle," the identification and the treatment process of traumatic neurosis hinge on establishing the traumatic event as a visible condition via the articulation of discursive memory.
First applied to the victims of railway accidents (Charcot 1887) and then to the 'shell-shocked' soldiers of the First World War (Mott 1919; Freud 2001a; Myers 1940), the notion of psychic trauma came to public notice thanks to the works of Sigmund Freud, whose conceptualisation of traumatic neurosis is still present in contemporary trauma critics such as Cathy Caruth (1995, 1996) or Roger Luckurst, who has described psychical trauma as:
Lear emphasizes that the traumatic neurosis enables Freud to isolate the compulsion to repeat, which functions before the pleasure principle (trauma has a retrospective structure), and that traumatic neurosis delivers a traumatic blow to Freud's theory of the mind (unconscious desire is inherently slippery).
Freud actually resists drawing this conclusion from traumatic neurosis alone.
One consequence of traumatic neurosis is the survivors' compulsion to repeat elements of the traumatic event.
3) For Freud, traumatic neurosis arose from the response to threats to life.
During the Great War, and on into the interwar period, some medics in Germany came to believe that it was these procedures that were themselves responsible for the constitution of traumatic neurosis (Lerner, 2003).
Shell-Shock: Traumatic Neurosis and the British Soldiers of the First World War, by Peter Leese.
This paper reviews some of the fundamental elements of the psychiatric disturbance known as postraumatic stress syndrome, which can be assimilated to the psychoanalytical category of traumatic neurosis concerning the definition and the victim's individual designation.
vaguely Freudian understanding of traumatic neurosis as an affliction