trapezius muscle


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tra·pe·zi·us mu·scle

(tră-pē'zē-ŭs mŭs'ĕl)
Origin, medial third of superior nuchal line, external occipital protuberance, ligamentum nuchae, spinous processes of seventh cervical and the thoracic vertebrae and corresponding supraspinous ligaments; insertion, lateral third of posterior surface of clavicle, anterior side of acromion, and upper and medial border of the spine of the scapula; action, when scapulae are fixed, portions of muscle can act independently: cervical portion elevates scapula, thoracic portion contributes to depression of scapula; upper and lowermost portions act simultaneously to rotate glenoid fossa superiorly; when the entire muscle and especially its middle part contracts, the scapulae retract; draws head to one side or backward; nerve supply, motor by accessory, sensory by cervical plexus.
Synonym(s): musculus trapezius [TA] , trapezius.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

trapezius muscle

Neck and back muscle. Origin: occipital bone (superior nuchal line), nuchal ligament, spinous processes of vertebrae C7-T12. Insertion: posterior edge of lateral clavicle, acromion, posterior edge of spine of scapula. Nerve: accessory (CN XI), spinal C3-C4. Action: elevates, retracts, and rotates scapula.
See: face and headfor illus.
See also: muscle
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

trapezius muscle

A large, triangular back muscle extending from the lower part of the back of the skull (occiput) almost to the lumbar region of the spine on each side. Each muscle extends outward from the rear processes of the vertebral column to the spine of the shoulder blade and the outer tip of the collar bone (clavicle). The trapezius muscle braces the shoulder blade and rotate it outwards when the arm is raised.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, the association between the 3-point exercise with conscious abdominal activation does not appear to be an interesting strategy for activating the trapezius muscles.
[3,4,11] Given the combined nerve innervations of the respiratory muscles and the deltoid, neck flexors and trapezius muscles via the corticospinal pathway (C1 - C6), [12,13] the question arises whether upper-limb muscle strength and endurance could predict successful extubation in mechanically ventilated patients by means of interneuron activation.
There was no main difference between DN of TrPs of upper trapezius muscles and DN of TrPs plus paraspinal muscles (p<0.05) but using Cohen's d, DN of TrPs of upper trapezius plus paraspinal muscle produced small effect (not significant) but in favor of the DN TrPs plus paraspinal muscles.
Contemporary findings regarding the anatomical patterns of CN XI and cervical nerve innervation of the trapezius muscle could have implications for the development of a modified radical neck dissection (MRND) technique [3, 6].
These include the spindle-shaped (e.g., the gracilis), the simple pinnate (e.g., external abdominal oblique muscle), bi-pinnate, two-headed (e.g., two-headed arm muscle), parallel (e.g., straight abdominal muscle), and uni-pinnate muscle (e.g., trapezius muscle).
In this observational study (case series), over a period of two years from August 2014 to July 2016, 41 male patients and 1 female patient with longstanding brachial plexus palsy underwent secondary reconstruction of the shoulder by transfer of trapezius muscle to proximal humerus.
We found that dissecting the trapezius muscle ventral to the great auricular nerve presents a risk to major blood vessels (Figure 5).
Likewise, in the current study, hyperalgesia was detected at painful areas (L1, L3, and L5 paravertebral muscles) and also at irrelevant sites as forearm and trapezius muscles in CLBP patients.
ROIs were drawn on the trapezius muscle at C7-T1 levels bilaterally, the splenius muscles, the semispinalis muscles, the elevator scapular muscles, and the trapezius muscles at C6-C7 levels bilaterally.
The trapezius muscle (TM) is a flat triangular muscle that is one of the major muscles of the back and neck and is responsible for shoulder movement.
Ultrasonic characterization of the upper trapezius muscle in patients with chronic neck pain.