trapezius


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Related to trapezius: latissimus dorsi

tra·pe·zi·us (mus·cle)

[TA]
extrinsic (thoracoappendicular) muscle of shoulder; origin, medial third of superior nuchal line, external occipital protuberance, ligamentum nuchae, spinous processes of seventh cervical and the thoracic vertebrae and corresponding supraspinous ligaments; insertion, lateral third of posterior surface of clavicle, anterior side of acromion, and upper and medial border of the spine of the scapula; action, when scapulae are fixed, portions of muscle can act independently: cervical portion elevates scapula, thoracic portion contributes to depression of scapula; upper and lowermost portions act simultaneously to rotate glenoid fossa superiorly; when the entire muscle and especially middle part contracts, the scapulae retract; draws head to one side or backward; nerve supply, motor by accessory, sensory by cervical plexus.
Synonym(s): musculus trapezius [TA], cowl muscle

trapezius

(trə-pē′zē-əs)
n. pl. trapezi·uses
Either of two large flat triangular muscles running from the base of the occiput to the middle of the back that support and make it possible to raise the head and shoulders.

trapezius

[trəpē′zē·əs]
Etymology: Gk, trapezion, small table
a large, flat, triangular superficial muscle of the shoulder and upper back. It arises from the occipital bone, the ligamentum nuchae, and the spinous processes of the seventh cervical and all the thoracic vertebrae. It acts to rotate the scapula upward; adduct, raise, or lower the shoulder; and retract the shoulder.
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Trapezius

tra·pe·zi·us mu·scle

(tră-pē'zē-ŭs mŭs'ĕl)
Origin, medial third of superior nuchal line, external occipital protuberance, ligamentum nuchae, spinous processes of seventh cervical and the thoracic vertebrae and corresponding supraspinous ligaments; insertion, lateral third of posterior surface of clavicle, anterior side of acromion, and upper and medial border of the spine of the scapula; action, when scapulae are fixed, portions of muscle can act independently: cervical portion elevates scapula, thoracic portion contributes to depression of scapula; upper and lowermost portions act simultaneously to rotate glenoid fossa superiorly; when the entire muscle and especially its middle part contracts, the scapulae retract; draws head to one side or backward; nerve supply, motor by accessory, sensory by cervical plexus.
Synonym(s): musculus trapezius [TA] , trapezius.
Figure 1: Efferent nerve pathways from the brainstem and spinal cord. Shown on the right: somatic, to skeletal muscles. Shown on the left: autonomic. B brain stem, C cervical, T thoracic, L lumbar, S sacral segments of the spinal cord. (Red shaded regions are those with no autonomic outflow.)

trapezius

large, triangular, superficial muscle on each side of the upper back, its origin extending in the midline from the base of the skull down to the spine of the lowest thoracic vertebra. From there its fibres converge towards the shoulder, and partly over it, round the side of the lower neck, to be inserted in a continuous line into the outer end of the clavicle and the spine of the scapula. The tone of the two muscles keeps the shoulders braced and they act with the scapular spine as a lever when lifting the arms at the shoulder. Figure 1.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this observational study (case series), over a period of two years from August 2014 to July 2016, 41 male patients and 1 female patient with longstanding brachial plexus palsy underwent secondary reconstruction of the shoulder by transfer of trapezius muscle to proximal humerus.
True dislocation typically does not occur because the AC joint is maintained by the trapezius and the deltoid muscles [1].
Muscles worked - Trapezius (Shoulders / Back), Rhomboid & Latissmus Dorsi (Back) and your Biceps (Upper Arm) Military Press -Standing straight have either the bar or dumbbells at shoulder level and push them up towards the ceiling taking care not to fully lock out your elbows.
The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of therapeutic sequences of the hot pack in combination with ultrasound on the physiological responses (TBF, PPT, STT, and VAS) for treatment of the latent myofascial trigger point (LMTrP) over upper trapezius muscle.
Although pain is not necessarily a part of this condition, when this condition has existed for a long time, the client does often experience upper back and neck pain, both due to the tightness of the upper trapezius and levator scapulae, and due to the accompanying imbalanced posture of the head that places increased stress on all the posterior extensor musculature of the cervicothoracic region.
Other muscles such as trapezius (upper and lower), rhomboids, pectoralis minor and major, subclavius and latissimus dorsi muscles may be tight and needs to be addressed in the rehabilitation process.
PPTs were measured with an analog Fisher algometer (Force Dial model FDK 40, Wagner Instruments; Greenwich, Connecticut) at the right upper trapezius (middle point between the spinal process of thoracic level 1 and the most lateral part of the acromion) and at the right M.
A study on female tennis players found significantly reduced lower trapezius strength in those diagnosed with LE, compared to symptom-free players and controls (Lucado et al 2012).
B) axial demonstrated atrophy of the right sternocleidomastoid and trapezius muscles.
Because of its numerous origins, the trapezius is able to move the scapulae in several different ways: the upper fibers raise and assist with upward rotation of the scapulae, the middle fibers (along with the rhomboid muscles) pull the scapulae together, and the lower fibers lower and also assist with upward rotation of the scapulae.