transvestism


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transvestism

 [trans-ves´tizm]
1. cross-dressing and otherwise assuming the appearance, manner, or roles traditionally associated with members of the opposite sex.
2. transvestic fetishism.

trans·ves·tism

(trans-ves'tizm),
The practice of dressing or masquerading in the clothes of the opposite sex; especially the adoption of feminine mannerisms and costume by a man.
Synonym(s): transvestitism
[trans- + L. vestio, to dress]

transvestism

/trans·ves·tism/ (-ves´tizm)
1. the practice of wearing articles of clothing and assuming the appearance, manner, or roles of the opposite sex.

transvestism

(trăns-vĕs′-tĭz′əm, trănz-) also

transvestitism

(-tĭ-tĭz′əm)
n.
1. Psychiatry The deriving of sexual gratification from fantasies or acts that involve dressing in clothes traditionally associated with the opposite sex.
2. Cross-dressing. In this sense, the term is sometimes considered offensive.

transvestism

[-ves′tizəm]
a tendency to achieve psychic and sexual relief by dressing in the clothing of the opposite sex.
Sexuoeroticism that hinges on dressing or masquerading in the clothes, especially underwear, of the opposite sex; it is far more common in men than in women. Cross-dressing with extreme gender dysphoria—persistent discomfort with one's present gender role or identity—may lead to sexual reassignment

transvestism

Cross-dressing Psychiatry Sexuoeroticism from dressing or masquerading as one of the opposite sex, a possibly unconscious lifestyle choice, more common in ♂. See Gynemimesis, Gynemimetophila, Gender identity disorder.

trans·ves·tism

(trans-ves'tizm)
The practice of dressing or masquerading in the clothes of the opposite sex; especially the adoption of feminine mannerisms and costume by a male.
Synonym(s): transvestitism.
[trans- + L. vestio, to dress]

transvestism

Male desire to wear women's clothing often for reasons of sexual gratification. The reciprocal phenomenon is not normally referred to as transvestism as it is not usually related to sexual pleasure. Transvestites are not usually transsexuals.

trans·ves·tism

(trans-ves'tizm)
Practice of dressing or masquerading in the clothes of the opposite sex.
[trans- + L. vestio, to dress]
References in periodicals archive ?
Transvestism inaugurates an epistemological shift that locates, defines, performs, and erases the fundamental dichotomy: Self/Other.
46) At one moment he attempts to show that Kaska transvestism did not decisively distinguish men from women, yet at another he leaves no doubt that, as one would expect, the people themselves were totally alert to those differences.
Dimensions of transvestism and transexualism: The validation and factorial structure of the Cross-Gender Questionnaire.
Joan's transvestism results in some of the most injurious accusations leveled against her at her trial.
To a modern reader, at least, transvestism in women seems to be less problematic or disturbing compared to masquerade or to male cross-dressing.
Theoretical models are implicit and omnipresent throughout Narrative Transvestism, yet they are rarely theorized per se, an omission that leads to vagueness just where specificity and clarity is needed.
As these very short summaries reveal, each character experiences his or her own period of transvestism, dressing across cultural or gender specific lines.
by showing the other's travesty through the denaturalization of genders, transvestism produces a "realness" for itself; and, by re-producing the other's "realness," by representing the other, by constructing the other's "realness," transvestism also reveals the "falseness" (that is, the construction) of the other.
What remains unanalyzed in Conlon's discussion is the role transvestism plays in carrying out these moments of recognition, or rather, the way in which cross-dressing serves as the vehicle by which Serafina and Juana (and, subsequently, the audience) may tap into this power of influence or force that guides their sexuality.
Attitudes towards transvestism demonstrate the same complexity, fluctuating with culture, historical era, and personal conviction.
Edward McGee, for his superb theatre history article, 'The English Entertainment for the French Ambassadors in 1564', based on an unfamiliar archival record, a letter in the Thynne family papers at Longleat narrating events relating to the 1564 occasion; Amy Tigner, for best interpretation of a topic in early drama, 'The Spanish Actress's Art: Improvisation, Transvestism, and Disruption in Tirso's El vergonzoso en palacio, discussing female actors in women's roles; and Jennifer Roberts-Smith, for best note with '"What makes thou upon a stage?
Partial nudity, transvestism and other expected debauchery grace several scenes.