transvestism

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Related to transvestic: transvestite

transvestism

 [trans-ves´tizm]
1. cross-dressing and otherwise assuming the appearance, manner, or roles traditionally associated with members of the opposite sex.
2. transvestic fetishism.

trans·ves·tism

(trans-ves'tizm),
The practice of dressing or masquerading in the clothes of the opposite sex; especially the adoption of feminine mannerisms and costume by a man.
Synonym(s): transvestitism
[trans- + L. vestio, to dress]

transvestism

/trans·ves·tism/ (-ves´tizm)
1. the practice of wearing articles of clothing and assuming the appearance, manner, or roles of the opposite sex.

transvestism

(trăns-vĕs′-tĭz′əm, trănz-) also

transvestitism

(-tĭ-tĭz′əm)
n.
1. Psychiatry The deriving of sexual gratification from fantasies or acts that involve dressing in clothes traditionally associated with the opposite sex.
2. Cross-dressing. In this sense, the term is sometimes considered offensive.

transvestism

[-ves′tizəm]
a tendency to achieve psychic and sexual relief by dressing in the clothing of the opposite sex.
Sexuoeroticism that hinges on dressing or masquerading in the clothes, especially underwear, of the opposite sex; it is far more common in men than in women. Cross-dressing with extreme gender dysphoria—persistent discomfort with one's present gender role or identity—may lead to sexual reassignment

transvestism

Cross-dressing Psychiatry Sexuoeroticism from dressing or masquerading as one of the opposite sex, a possibly unconscious lifestyle choice, more common in ♂. See Gynemimesis, Gynemimetophila, Gender identity disorder.

trans·ves·tism

(trans-ves'tizm)
The practice of dressing or masquerading in the clothes of the opposite sex; especially the adoption of feminine mannerisms and costume by a male.
Synonym(s): transvestitism.
[trans- + L. vestio, to dress]

transvestism

Male desire to wear women's clothing often for reasons of sexual gratification. The reciprocal phenomenon is not normally referred to as transvestism as it is not usually related to sexual pleasure. Transvestites are not usually transsexuals.

trans·ves·tism

(trans-ves'tizm)
Practice of dressing or masquerading in the clothes of the opposite sex.
[trans- + L. vestio, to dress]
References in periodicals archive ?
Of the 118 men in this study, 55 met DSM-IV criteria for pedophilia (47%), 34 for transvestic fetishism (29%), 6 for exhibitionism (5%), 4 for sadism (3%), 5 for frotteurism (4%), 5 for paraphilias not otherwise specified (4%), and 4 for voyeurism (3%).
Elsewhere in his book Eby writes, "To say that Hemingway was a transvestite would mistakenly give the impression that such fantasies dominated his erotic life; yet within the dominant held of his fetishistic fantasy, the transvestic position was one to which he returned repeatedly" (101).
Such an interpretation may initially strike many readers as unlikely--especially since Catherine, not David, is supposed to be the "crazy" character in the novel--but it is supported by close attention to a kindred group of cryptic transvestic metamorphoses in The Garden of Eden, the Islands in the Stream manuscript, Across the River and into the Trees, and True at First Light.
One can easily see how heterosexual sodomy, in Hemingway's case, could produce an even more powerful "body hallucination" of the same type, "confirming" for him the "reality" both of the phallic woman and of his own transvestic transformation into a girl.
These moments of transvestic hallucination and heterosexual sodomy, however, perform yet another function for Hemingway and his male characters; they paradoxically shore up an important but fragile aspect of their collective masculinity.
But if, as I assert, transvestic behavior is most clearly defined by the fetishist's wearing of his fetish object (often before a mirror) to engage in a fantasy of being the illusory phallic woman, what can I possibly mean by the phrase "transvestism in its most fetishistic forms"?
Yet in spite of the seemingly macho spear-shaking, Hemingway's attempt to go native, insofar as it involved a sort of fetishistic cross-dressing, was, like David Bourne's transformation, inherently transvestic.
If the act of writing in Mary's diary doesn't in itself strike us as vaguely transvestic, it is hard to overlook Ernest's desire to be one of Mary's "girls.
Here, again, Hemingway assumes the fetishized item himself in a subtly transvestic act.