transubstantiation


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Related to transubstantiation: consubstantiation

transubstantiation

(trăn″sŭb-stăn″shē-ā′shŭn) [″ + substantia, substance]
The process of replacing one tissue for another.
References in periodicals archive ?
assumes that modern Catholics find the doctrine of transubstantiation "embarrassing at the present time" (231).
While the main object of contestation was the doctrine of transubstantiation, Lollard and reformer doctrinal attacks rejected orthodox claims that the consecrating priest "made" the body of Christ.
Bevington emphasizes that 'the acceptance of dramatic miracle in the Sacrament play is therefore synonymous with the acceptance of the doctrine of transubstantiation, not abstractly but vividly and immediately', and Emmerson suggests an analogue between Chester's Antichrist and the Croxton Play, as both rely on 'miraculous use of divine power to confront doubt' about the real presence.
For Aquinas, the Eucharist as banquet, food, memorial, instrument of grace, and pledge of future glory--the aspects of the Eucharistic mystery he lists in his O sacrum convivium--achieve their full intelligibility only when ordered beneath transubstantiation's soaring and form-defining vaults.
Jack Juggler is much wittier than such Edwardian morality plays, but its serious subtext is hinted at through the author's decision to center its action on a proverb--"A man cannot be in two places at once"--which was central to Reformed critiques of the doctrine of transubstantiation. (18) When Careaway explains to his master that "I met even now with that other I" (1.790), Boun-grace dismisses Careaway's existential doubts with proverbial wisdom:
Parker's intention was to sustain AElfric's text was an evidence of the Anglo-Saxon belief in a spiritual communion and not a real blood and flesh one, which would imply a transubstantiation of wine and bread.
Giles largely accepts Aquinas's account of transubstantiation, but seeks a deeper explanation of the 'no common-constituent' problem (99).
It was not until the Fourth Lateran Council in 1215 that the Roman church adopted "transubstantiation." Even still, Eastern Christians do not use the term (though they share in belief that the eucharistic elements change to become the sacrament of Christ's body and blood during the Mass).
The Transubstantiation Challenge Cup they'd have called it.
As per the church, the song's title derives from the words "hocus pocus", the phrase which was a Puritan parody of the Latin "hoc est enim corpus meum" or "this is my body" used by Catholic priests to accompany the transubstantiation during mass.
The second, and much shorter part, is a glossary of terms and events which could be longer: there are no definitions, for example, for the Virgin Birth, justification by faith, Assumption, transubstantiation and so on.
Wandel discusses how the 1215 Lateran IV teaching on transubstantiation served to move priestly authority to new heights, even while popular piety promoted the circulation of host miracle stories and tales of host desecration by Jews.