transtemporal

transtemporal

(trăns-tĕm′pō-răl) [″ + temporalis, pert. to a temple]
Crossing the temporal lobe of the cerebrum.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Here the appropriate analogy would be Saint Augustine's notion of the civitas Dei, which cannot be identified with the existing church when conceived as a congregation; rather, within that assembly, they are those who are members of the spiritual transtemporal community and those who are actually simply "children of the world," even if they hold important positions within the group (sunt extra qui sunt intra).
Poems by Czeslaw Milosz, Zbigniew Herbert, Miron Bialoszewski, and Wislcawa Szymborska--the foremost representatives of the "Polish school of poetry"--are firmly rooted in concrete historical experience, yet at the same time they inscribe this experience in a system of values that are transnational and transtemporal. In Under Pressure (1965), a book of essays on the writer's relationship to society, the eminent British critic A.
Why should someone who rejects the notion of objective and transtemporal truth grant political prerogatives to religionists whom they know to profess such truths and to hold them with religious faith?
In the United States, the most important source of the expression of the transtemporal will of the popular sovereign is to be found in the Supreme Court.
In addition, I am attempting to do this from a transtemporal and transtraditional point of view.
Transcranial color-coded Doppler (TCD) sonography uses transtemporal, transorbital and transforaminal windows to obtain images of the intracranial vasculature.
Hirsch, Hydroxyapatite cement: A new method for achieving watertight closure in transtemporal surgery, Am.
Its memory must be organic and transtemporal, else the culture dies or survives only as a hollow shell.
So it is a kind of rapid transit, but then it is transtemporal. Why wouldn't it be rapid, everything is moving faster and faster.