transsynaptic degeneration

trans·sy·nap·tic de·gen·er·a·tion

an atrophy of nerve cells after damage to the axons that make synaptic connection with them; noted especially in the lateral geniculate body.

trans·sy·nap·tic de·gen·er·a·tion

(tranz-si-nap'tik dĕ-jen'ĕr-ā'shŭn)
An atrophy of nerve cells following damage to the axons that make synaptic connection with them; noted especially in the lateral geniculate body.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chang, "Evident transsynaptic degeneration of motor neurons after spinal cord injury: a study of neuromuscular jitter by axonal microstimulation," American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, vol.
Clinical electrophysiological studies suggest that transsynaptic degeneration occurred in the lower motor neurons, while pathological evidence is lacked.
Transsynaptic degeneration of lower motor neurons secondary to upper motor neurons injury plays a role in muscle mass loss.
It has been demonstrated that transsynaptic degeneration occurred wildly in nervous system after cerebral cortex injury, such as cerebellum, [sup][3] thalamus, [sup][4],[5],[6],[7],[8],[9] and substantial nigra, [sup][4],[10],[11],[12] whereas transsynaptic degeneration in motor system remains controversial.
Our work combined the electrophysiological and pathological assessments to investigate the existence transsynaptic degeneration in the motor system, and the relationship between electrophysiology and pathology.
Posterior horn neurons also declined, and even faster than anterior neurons, illustrating that transsynaptic degeneration also existed in the sensory system, which was consistent with the previous study.