transposon


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to transposon: insertion sequence

transposon

 [tranz-po´zon]
a discrete DNA sequence that transposes blocks of genetic material back and forth within a bacterial cell from the chromosome to plasmids or bacteriophage particles, by which the material may be transferred to another cell. Transposons frequently carry genes for resistance to antibiotics.

trans·po·son

(tranz-pō'son),
A segment of DNA (for example, an R-factor gene) that has a repeat of an insertion sequence element at each end that can migrate from one plasmid to another within the same bacterium, to a bacterial chromosome, or to a bacteriophage; the mechanism of transposition seems to be independent of the host's usual recombination mechanism. See: jumping gene, transposable element.
[L. transpono, pp. transpositum, to transfer, + -on]

transposon

/trans·po·son/ (trans-po´zon) a small mobile genetic (DNA) element that moves around the genome or to other genomes within the same cell, usually by copying itself to a second site but sometimes by splicing itself out of its original site and inserting in a new location. Eukaryotic transposons are sometimes called transposable elements.

transposon

(trăns-pō′zŏn)
n.
A segment of DNA that is capable of moving into a new position within the same or another chromosome or plasmid. Also called jumping gene.

transposon

[transpō′sən]
Etymology: L, transponere + on
a segment of DNA that can move from one place to another in a cell's genome or between a bacterial cell and a plasmid or virus. Viruses may even carry a transposon from one bacterium to another. Also called jumping gene, transposable element.

trans·po·son

(trans-pō'zon)
A segment of DNA that has a repeat of an insertion sequence element at each end that can migrate from one plasmid to another within the same bacterium, to a bacterial chromosome, or to a bacteriophage.
[L. transpono, pp. transpositum, to transfer, + -on]

transposon

a TRANSPOSABLE GENETIC ELEMENT that often contains genes in addition to those required for transposition, such as antibiotic-resistance genes. There are two main classes in prokaryotes: compound or composite, having copies of an INSERTION SEQUENCE at each end; and complex, having terminal INVERTED REPEAT sequences (generally about 30bp) but no known insertion sequences.

transposon

see transposable genetic elements.
References in periodicals archive ?
Loss of transposon delivery vector through its failure to replicate in the S.
And, appropriately enough, a technique using McClintock's transposons is being used as a shortcut method.
The DNA transposons are the oldest type of transposable element and are largely completely degenerate as a result of deletion and truncation events over time.
The difference in the dissemination of these resistant traits may be related to the observation that the vanA gene cluster is often located on a transposon which, in turn, can be a part of a conjugative (transferable) plasmid (45).
They can be classified into two main groups called DNA transposons and retrotransposons.
Some jump about so regularly that they have been dubbed "mariner transposons.
They knew the gene resided in the Rp-1 locus on chromosome 10, and among the 200 000-odd maize plants that they had transposon-tagged in the 1980s were several that had lost Rp1-D-type resistance, presumably because the Rp1-D gene had been disrupted by a Ds transposon.
Essentially, the researchers moved the transposons into cells of tobacco plantlets and then raised them into seedlings that had the transposon inside.
KPC-3] in association with isoform d of the transposon Tn4401, and all isolates were clonally related (Figure).
They have also demonstrated that resistance arose independently in each strain after it acquired a specific bit of genetic material called transposon Tn1546.
The research team compared transposon sites first identified in the original published human "index" genome and found approximately 100 new transposon sites in each person screened.
Transposon derived sequences account for at least 45% of the human genome, a hefty proportion when compared with the 1% given over to protein coding regions (Jordon et al.

Full browser ?