transposon


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Related to transposon: insertion sequence

transposon

 [tranz-po´zon]
a discrete DNA sequence that transposes blocks of genetic material back and forth within a bacterial cell from the chromosome to plasmids or bacteriophage particles, by which the material may be transferred to another cell. Transposons frequently carry genes for resistance to antibiotics.

trans·po·son

(tranz-pō'son),
A segment of DNA (for example, an R-factor gene) that has a repeat of an insertion sequence element at each end that can migrate from one plasmid to another within the same bacterium, to a bacterial chromosome, or to a bacteriophage; the mechanism of transposition seems to be independent of the host's usual recombination mechanism. See: jumping gene, transposable element.
[L. transpono, pp. transpositum, to transfer, + -on]

transposon

(trăns-pō′zŏn)
n.
A segment of DNA that is capable of moving into a new position within the same or another chromosome or plasmid. Also called jumping gene.

trans·po·son

(trans-pō'zon)
A segment of DNA that has a repeat of an insertion sequence element at each end that can migrate from one plasmid to another within the same bacterium, to a bacterial chromosome, or to a bacteriophage.
[L. transpono, pp. transpositum, to transfer, + -on]

transposon

a TRANSPOSABLE GENETIC ELEMENT that often contains genes in addition to those required for transposition, such as antibiotic-resistance genes. There are two main classes in prokaryotes: compound or composite, having copies of an INSERTION SEQUENCE at each end; and complex, having terminal INVERTED REPEAT sequences (generally about 30bp) but no known insertion sequences.
References in periodicals archive ?
Several observations were made: (i) the length of the small RNAs ranged between 23 and 29 nt, (ii) these RNAs showed strong preference for Uridine at the 5' end, and (iii) most of the sequences could be aligned to annotated transposons or their remnants.
Furthermore BLASTn searching revealed 2 types of transposons as putative targets of 5 down regulated ncRNAs suggesting that these repeat sequences would be more activity under Zinc stress.
(38) On the average, about ten different lncRNA are produced for every coding locus, using alternative reading frames overlapping the locus--including transposons, templating of the noncoding side, and so forth.
Researchers exposed translucent zebrafish to transposons, "jumping genes" that move around inside the genome of a cell.
VanA glycopeptide resistance: The vanA gene and the other genes involved in the regulation and expression of vancomycin resistance (vanR, vanS, vanH, vanX, and vanZ) are located on a 10,581-bp transposon (Tn 1546) of E.
They knew the gene resided in the Rp-1 locus on chromosome 10, and among the 200 000-odd maize plants that they had transposon-tagged in the 1980s were several that had lost Rp1-D-type resistance, presumably because the Rp1-D gene had been disrupted by a Ds transposon. But a host of Ds transposons now peppered the chromosomes of the mutant plants.
In this case, her team employed the transposon Activator from corn to seek N in laboratory tobacco plantlets.
Although the conditions in which a transposon can spread parasitically have been examined theoretically (Charlesworth and Charlesworth 1983; Charlesworth and Langley 1986; Charlesworth 1987), there has been very little experimental investigation of the degree to which these models actually describe transposon behavior.
The upstream sequence of [bla.sub.KPC]-positive strains was analyzed to determine the isoform of the transposon Tn4401 that harbored [bla.sub.KPC] (7).
Hayes has a proven track record for building teams around new scientific concepts and technologies, including transposon systems, cancer vaccines, and bispecific monoclonal antibodies.

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