transposon


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Related to transposon: insertion sequence

transposon

 [tranz-po´zon]
a discrete DNA sequence that transposes blocks of genetic material back and forth within a bacterial cell from the chromosome to plasmids or bacteriophage particles, by which the material may be transferred to another cell. Transposons frequently carry genes for resistance to antibiotics.

trans·po·son

(tranz-pō'son),
A segment of DNA (for example, an R-factor gene) that has a repeat of an insertion sequence element at each end that can migrate from one plasmid to another within the same bacterium, to a bacterial chromosome, or to a bacteriophage; the mechanism of transposition seems to be independent of the host's usual recombination mechanism. See: jumping gene, transposable element.
[L. transpono, pp. transpositum, to transfer, + -on]

transposon

/trans·po·son/ (trans-po´zon) a small mobile genetic (DNA) element that moves around the genome or to other genomes within the same cell, usually by copying itself to a second site but sometimes by splicing itself out of its original site and inserting in a new location. Eukaryotic transposons are sometimes called transposable elements.

transposon

(trăns-pō′zŏn)
n.
A segment of DNA that is capable of moving into a new position within the same or another chromosome or plasmid. Also called jumping gene.

transposon

[transpō′sən]
Etymology: L, transponere + on
a segment of DNA that can move from one place to another in a cell's genome or between a bacterial cell and a plasmid or virus. Viruses may even carry a transposon from one bacterium to another. Also called jumping gene, transposable element.

trans·po·son

(trans-pō'zon)
A segment of DNA that has a repeat of an insertion sequence element at each end that can migrate from one plasmid to another within the same bacterium, to a bacterial chromosome, or to a bacteriophage.
[L. transpono, pp. transpositum, to transfer, + -on]

transposon

a TRANSPOSABLE GENETIC ELEMENT that often contains genes in addition to those required for transposition, such as antibiotic-resistance genes. There are two main classes in prokaryotes: compound or composite, having copies of an INSERTION SEQUENCE at each end; and complex, having terminal INVERTED REPEAT sequences (generally about 30bp) but no known insertion sequences.

transposon

see transposable genetic elements.
References in periodicals archive ?
An Enterobacter plasmid as a new genetic background for the transposon Tn1331.
La lista de la derecha contiene el origen de las muestras, los resultados del analisis de las secuencias del gen blaKPC, de la region no conservada del transposon Tn4401, la secuencia tipo (ST), el estado, ciudad y hospital de donde provienen las muestras.
Transposon Display Identifies individual transposable elements in high copy lines.
In addition to the elimination of target gene function, the fusion of transposon DNA physically marks the genetic locus and, importantly for this work, provides a quantitative measure of target gene expression.
Geneticist Virginia Walbot at Stanford University has discovered a special kind of jumping gene called a "mutator transposon," endemic in a Mexican maize called Zapalote chico and grown only by Zapotec farmers near the town of Tehuantepec in Oaxaca.
Dennis and her colleagues are gene hunters; they explore the Arabidopsis genome with a technique called transposon tagging.
Transformations in strains could be brought about, and transposon mutagenesis could be one of the ways of evolving more suitable strains for tackling various situations.
It seems far more likely that a transposon was responsible for the sudden wave of mutations.
Distinct mechanisms determine transposon inheritance and methylation via small interfering RNA and histone modification.
Tdrd5 is essential for transposon silencing and spermiogenesis in the mice (Yabuta et al.

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