transposition


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Related to transposition: Transposition of the great arteries, Transposition of the great vessels

transposition

 [trans″po-zish´un]
displacement to the opposite side; in genetics, the nonreciprocal insertion of material deleted from one chromosome into another, nonhomologous chromosome.
transposition of great vessels a congenital heart defect in which the position of the chief blood vessels of the heart is reversed, so that the aorta arises from the right ventricle instead of the left and the pulmonary artery emerges from the left ventricle rather than from the right. The result is that oxygen-poor blood returning from the systemic circulation to the right side of the heart gets pumped back into the general circulation instead of being transported to the lungs, and oxygen-rich blood flows aimlessly to and from the lungs. The condition may be corrected by surgery.
Complete transposition of great arteries.

trans·po·si·tion

(trans-pō-zi'shŭn),
1. Removal from one place to another; metathesis.
2. The condition of being in the wrong place or on the wrong side of the body (for example, viscera placed opposite their normal position; such as liver on the left or apex of heart on right).
3. Movement to a new site in the genome.
4. Misplacement of teeth from normal sequence in the arch.

transposition

/trans·po·si·tion/ (trans″po-zish´un)
1. displacement of a viscus to the opposite side.
2. the operation of carrying a tissue flap from one situation to another without severing its connection entirely until it is united at its new location.
3. the exchange of position of two atoms within a molecule.

transposition of great vessels  a congenital cardiovascular malformation in which the position of the chief blood vessels of the heart is reversed. Life then depends on a crossflow of blood between the right and left sides of the heart, as through a ventricular septal defect.

transposition

(trăns′pə-zĭsh′ən)
n.
Genetics Transfer of a segment of DNA to a new position on the same or another chromosome or plasmid.

trans′po·si′tion·al adj.

transposition

Pediatrics A malposition of an organ or tissues that occurs during embryogenesis Psychiatry See Gender identity transposition Surgery Plastic surgery in which a flap of tissue is moved from one site to another and allowed sufficient time to establish a new blood supply before severing the vascular connection with the donor site. See Sensory nerve transposition.

trans·po·si·tion

(trans'pŏ-zish'ŭn)
1. Removal from one place to another; metathesis.
2. The condition of being transposed to the wrong side of the body, as in transposition of the viscera, in which the viscera are located opposite their normal position.
3. Positioning of teeth out of their normal sequence in an arch.

transposition

In genetics, the movement of a length of genetic material from one point in a DNA molecule to another.

transposition 

1. The act of converting the prescription of an ophthalmic lens from a sphere with minus cylinder form to a sphere with plus cylinder form or vice versa. Example: −3 D sphere −2 D cylinder axis 180º transposes to −5 D sphere +2 D cylinder axis 90º.
2. A surgical procedure used to correct muscle paralysis. In this procedure, adjacent muscles are transferred (transposed) to the paralysed muscle, allowing for partial movement in the field of action of the paretic muscle. There are various procedures: one in which parts of the recti muscles are sutured together (the superior and inferior recti are disinserted and joined to the lateral rectus) to correct lateral rectus palsy and improve abduction (Hummelsheim's procedure or

trans·po·si·tion

(trans'pŏ-zish'ŭn)
1. Misplacement of teeth from normal sequence in the arch.
2. Removal from one place to another; metathesis.
3. Condition of being in wrong place or on wrong side of the body.

transposition

displacement to the opposite side; in genetics, the nonreciprocal insertion of material deleted from one chromosome into another, nonhomologous chromosome.

transposition of arterial trunks
see transposition of great vessels (below).
transposition of great vessels
a congenital heart defect, in which the position of the chief blood vessels of the heart is reversed. Called also transposition of arterial trunks.
ulnar styloid transposition
a surgical procedure for correction of growth deformity resulting from premature closure of the distal ulnar physis. The distal tip of the ulna is fused to the distal radial epiphysis.
References in periodicals archive ?
In cases where there is no communication of the national transposition measures, the Commission may propose to the Court to impose financial sanctions.
Users leverage existing Transposition rules or write custom ones according to smart "suggestion" by the machine.
Transposition of SRO 727(I)/2011 to Schedule with 5% rate of sales tax.
The scoreboard can be consulted either by mode of transport (road, rail, waterborne, air) or by one of the categories of single market (access to market, regulation), infrastructure, environmental impact, safety, transposition of EU law, infringements of EU law, innovation and research, and logistics.
Atrial flutter is common in patients with congenital heart disease, especially in patients with transposition of the great arteries who had undergone palliative atrial switch operations.
Birgit Szabo, one of the experimenters from the University of Vienna, said that the majority of the eight birds readily and spontaneously solved Transposition, Rotation and Translocation tasks whereas only two out of eight choose immediately and reliably the correct location in the original Piagetian invisible displacement task in which a smaller cup is visiting two of three bigger screens.
The European Commission announced Thursday the launch of the online Only Single Market Scoreboard, which incorporates comprehensive reports on 13 governance tools including monitoring the correct transposition of EU directives, analysis of infringement proceedings, administrative cooperation networks and various information and problem-solving services.
6] and their presence in leads V1, II, III, and aVF suggested ventricular inversion, an integral feature of congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries, a diagnosis also brought to mind by the chest radiograph (Figure 2) (1).
Tara was born with transposition of the great artery and had heart surgery at Birmingham Children's Hospital and various operations at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham.
Most Competent Authorities, however, have not yet codified those new importer and distributor requirements into their own playbooks when they transposed Directive 2007/47/EC into their regulations--the United Kingdom's Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA)'s transposition certainly did not include importers and distributors.