transposase


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trans·pos·ase

(trans-pōz'ās),
An enzyme that is required for transposition of DNA segments.
[L. trans-pono, pp. trans-positum, to set across, transfer, + -ase]

transposase

[trans′pəzās]
an enzyme involved in the movement of a DNA fragment from one site in the genome to another.

trans·pos·ase

(trans-pōz'ās)
An enzyme that is required for transposition of DNA segments.
[L. trans-pono, pp. trans-positum, to set across, transfer, + -ase]

transposase

an enzyme that acts on transposable elements in DNA mutagenesis.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Leap-In Transposase rapidly catalyzes the stable integration of genes into a target genome.
In the study, researchers tagged cells using a transposon, a piece of genetic code that can jump to a random point in DNA when exposed to an enzyme called transposase, to track blood progenitors and adult stem cells during the natural, unperturbed process of blood regeneration.
Recently, an efficient transgenic production system was established using piggyBac transposase and transposon elements [2,3].
In comparing the genetic context of rmtE1 and rmtE2, ISCR20-like transposase is located upstream of rmtE1 and rmtE2 (GenBank accession nos.
A transposon is a piece of genetic code that can jump to a random point in DNA when exposed to an enzyme called transposase.
Virtually all marin-like elements found in natural populations are non-functional pseudogenes, containing stop signals, deletions, frameshifts, or missense mutations that either disrupt the open reading frame or produce an inactive transposase (Robertson and
The company tested more than two million variations of the piggyBacTM transposase enzyme and discovered versions of the enzyme that are more than 10 times more active than the version found in nature.
This technology uses a transposase enzyme complexed with a transposon, which, in this case, contains Illumina adapters (product data sheet).
The PiggyBac process involves shipping cargos of genetic material - called transposons - around the genome using an engine known as a transposase.
They possess an enzyme called a transposase which enables them to cut-and-paste themselves into new sites in the genome.