transport

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transport

 [trans´port]
1. movement of materials in biologic systems, particularly across the cell membrane into and out of cells or across epithelial layers.
2. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as moving a patient from one location to another.
active transport see active transport.
oxygen transport the carrying of oxygen through the bloodstream bound to hemoglobin (see oxyhemoglobin).
passive transport the movement of materials, usually across cell membranes, by processes not requiring expenditure of metabolic energy. See also active transport.

trans·port

(trans'pōrt),
The movement or transference of biochemical substances in biologic systems.
[L. transporto, to carry over, fr. trans- + porto, to carry]

transport

/trans·port/ (trans´port) movement of materials in biological systems, particularly into and out of cells and across epithelial layers.
active transport  movement of materials in biological systems resulting directly from expenditure of metabolic energy.
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(A) Passive transport exemplified by diffusion of potassium ions across the plasma membrane, through specific ion channels, down a concentration gradient; (B) active transport exemplified by the cellular sodium pump, which uses ATP hydrolysis to create gradients of sodium and potassium across the plasma membrane.
bulk transport  the uptake by or extrusion from a cell of fluid or particles, accomplished by invagination and vacuole formation (uptake) or by evagination (extrusion); it includes endocytosis, phagocytosis, pinocytosis, and exocytosis.

transport

[trans′pôrt]
Etymology: L, trans, across, portare, carry
the movement or transference of biochemical substances from one site to another. Active transport involves an expenditure of energy, whereas passive transport allows movement down a gradient without an energy expenditure.

trans·port

(trans'pōrt)
1. The movement or transference of biochemical substances in biologic systems.
2. In physical therapy, movement of patients from one area (or surface) to another.
See: transfer (3)
[L. transporto, to carry over, fr. trans- + porto, to carry]

transport

the movement of materials through a system, as in an ELECTRON TRANSPORT SYSTEM.

trans·port

(trans'pōrt)
The movement or transference of biochemical substances in biologic systems.
[L. transporto, to carry over, fr. trans- + porto, to carry]

transport,

n the movement of biochemical substances from one site to another.
transport, active,
n transport of substances through membranes or epithelium, requiring metabolic energy.
transport, passive,
n transport along a gradient without the use of metabolic energy.

transport

1. movement of materials in biological systems, particularly into and out of cells and across epithelial layers.
2. transport of animals, see transit, transportation.

active transport
see active transport.
transport death
death during transportation, e.g. porcine stress syndrome.
transport host
transport media
see transport medium.
membrane transport proteins
specific proteins associated with the plasma membrane of cells that are responsible for transferring solutes including ions, sugars, amino acids, nucleotides and many metabolites across cell membranes.
transport myopathy
see exertional rhabdomyolysis.
transport stress
stress imposed by lack of access to water and feed, physical exhaustion caused by standing for long periods, heat stress, aggression by other animals.
transport tetany
see transit tetany.
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The Oshkosh L-ATV provides an entirely new generation of light vehicles with unprecedented levels of off-road mobility, transportability and survivability.
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Units can order or view the pamphlets and other transportability references for free on TEA's website:
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This etherealness, in conjunction with the artwork's transportability, undercuts the grandeur usually associated with murals.
Transportability was a significant factor leading to the decision to adopt the new band track technology.
A materiel fielding plan, transportability report, and the ILS portion of the contractual statement of work were added.
PDRP nurse co-ordinators should also meet regularly as a national group to ensure the ongoing consistency and transportability of the programmes.

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