transport


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transport

 [trans´port]
1. movement of materials in biologic systems, particularly across the cell membrane into and out of cells or across epithelial layers.
2. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as moving a patient from one location to another.
active transport see active transport.
oxygen transport the carrying of oxygen through the bloodstream bound to hemoglobin (see oxyhemoglobin).
passive transport the movement of materials, usually across cell membranes, by processes not requiring expenditure of metabolic energy. See also active transport.

trans·port

(trans'pōrt),
The movement or transference of biochemical substances in biologic systems.
[L. transporto, to carry over, fr. trans- + porto, to carry]

transport

/trans·port/ (trans´port) movement of materials in biological systems, particularly into and out of cells and across epithelial layers.
active transport  movement of materials in biological systems resulting directly from expenditure of metabolic energy.
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(A) Passive transport exemplified by diffusion of potassium ions across the plasma membrane, through specific ion channels, down a concentration gradient; (B) active transport exemplified by the cellular sodium pump, which uses ATP hydrolysis to create gradients of sodium and potassium across the plasma membrane.
bulk transport  the uptake by or extrusion from a cell of fluid or particles, accomplished by invagination and vacuole formation (uptake) or by evagination (extrusion); it includes endocytosis, phagocytosis, pinocytosis, and exocytosis.

transport

[trans′pôrt]
Etymology: L, trans, across, portare, carry
the movement or transference of biochemical substances from one site to another. Active transport involves an expenditure of energy, whereas passive transport allows movement down a gradient without an energy expenditure.

trans·port

(trans'pōrt)
1. The movement or transference of biochemical substances in biologic systems.
2. In physical therapy, movement of patients from one area (or surface) to another.
See: transfer (3)
[L. transporto, to carry over, fr. trans- + porto, to carry]

transport

the movement of materials through a system, as in an ELECTRON TRANSPORT SYSTEM.

trans·port

(trans'pōrt)
The movement or transference of biochemical substances in biologic systems.
[L. transporto, to carry over, fr. trans- + porto, to carry]

transport,

n the movement of biochemical substances from one site to another.
transport, active,
n transport of substances through membranes or epithelium, requiring metabolic energy.
transport, passive,
n transport along a gradient without the use of metabolic energy.

transport

1. movement of materials in biological systems, particularly into and out of cells and across epithelial layers.
2. transport of animals, see transit, transportation.

active transport
see active transport.
transport death
death during transportation, e.g. porcine stress syndrome.
transport host
transport media
see transport medium.
membrane transport proteins
specific proteins associated with the plasma membrane of cells that are responsible for transferring solutes including ions, sugars, amino acids, nucleotides and many metabolites across cell membranes.
transport myopathy
see exertional rhabdomyolysis.
transport stress
stress imposed by lack of access to water and feed, physical exhaustion caused by standing for long periods, heat stress, aggression by other animals.
transport tetany
see transit tetany.
References in classic literature ?
We met here with new delays; the fleet that was to transport us did not appear, the patriarch lost all patience, and his zeal so much affected the commander at Diou, that he undertook to equip a vessel for us, and pushed the work forward with the utmost diligence.
I say so because if my lord the king, your worship's father-in-law, will not condescend to give you my lady the princess, there is nothing for it but, as your worship says, to seize her and transport her.
Centralisation of the means of communication and transport in the hands of the State.
This operation required several hours, during which time a number of the chariots were requisitioned to transport the loot, which consisted in arms, ammunition, silks, furs, jewels, strangely carved stone vessels, and a quantity of solid foods and liquids, including many casks of water, the first I had seen since my advent upon Mars.
With a transport of glee, I mauled the unresisting body, tasting delight from every blow; and it was not till weariness had begun to succeed, that I was suddenly, in the top fit of my delirium, struck through the heart by a cold thrill of terror.
and so you did,' he cried, as if in a transport of delight, his voice sounding false in his own ears.
But this extraordinary creature could transport itself from one place to another with surprising velocity; as, in an interval of three days, the Governor Higginson and the Columbus had observed it at two different points of the chart, separated by a distance of more than seven hundred nautical leagues.
The snow had hardened, and Mudge was very confident of being able to transport Mr.
Close inshore was a multitude of fishing smacks--English, Scotch, French, Dutch, and Swedish; steam launches from the Thames, yachts, electric boats; and beyond were ships of large burden, a multitude of filthy colliers, trim merchantmen, cattle ships, passenger boats, petroleum tanks, ocean tramps, an old white transport even, neat white and grey liners from Southampton and Hamburg; and along the blue coast across the Blackwater my brother could make out dimly a dense swarm of boats chaffering with the people on the beach, a swarm which also extended up the Blackwater almost to Maldon.
The cart was returning empty to Paris, and the two lackeys had agreed, for their transport, to slake the wagoner's thirst along the route.
Mercedes seized Fernand's hands with a transport which he took for love, but which was only joy at being no longer alone in the world, and seeing at last a friend, after long hours of solitary sorrow.
Very sad were they, likewise, while tossing upon the ocean in the crowded transport vessels.

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