transmyocardial revascularization


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Related to transmyocardial revascularization: Arterial revascularization

transmyocardial revascularization

Laser heart surgery Cardiovascular surgery A technique used for Pts with incapacitating heart disease, in which 15 to 30 1-mm in diameter holes are 'drilled' by laser into the myocardium, in an operation that takes 60–90 mins; indications for TMR are similar to those for repeat CABGs–ie, severe heart disease Pros No need for heart-lung machine; lower costs–CABG is $15,000 to $20,000, recuperation is shorter Mortality ±8% Outcome 1 yr post-surgery, 90% of Pts have improved to NYHA class 1 to 2 angina Cf CABG.

transmyocardial revascularization

Abbreviation: TMR
The use of a laser to bore tiny channels directly through the wall of the heart in an attempt to bring oxygen-rich blood from the left ventricular cavity to areas where the heart muscle is oxygen-deprived, or ischemic. TMR is an alternative to coronary bypass surgery or angioplasty, esp. in patients with complex plaques that would be difficult to reach with standard interventions or in patients who have already undergone many other procedures without effect.
Synonym: percutaneous myocardial revascularization
References in periodicals archive ?
Adjunctive transmyocardial revascularization: five-year follow-up of a prospective, randomized trial.
Transmyocardial revascularization utilizing a holmium: YAG laser.
The first group is stable patients with refractory, severe angina who are not amenable to conventional revascularization and who can be treated solely with transmyocardial revascularization or maximal medical therapy.
CardioGenesis develops, manufactures and markets proprietary systems including disposable products, to perform intraoperative transmyocardial revascular-ization, catheter-based percutaneous myocardial revascularization, and thoracoscopic transmyocardial revascularization to treat patients afflicted with debilitating angina.
Once that happens, this relatively easily learned catheter-based procedure will quickly render obsolete the surgical version, which is known as transmyocardial revascularization (TMR), according to Dr.
Mortality did not differ between the two groups in the multicenter study, which involved 132 patients randomly assigned to undergo transmyocardial revascularization along with medical therapy and 97 randomly assigned to receive medical therapy alone.
The magnitude of clinical benefit obtained with the investigational catheter- based laser revascularization method appears to be the same as that achieved with transmyocardial revascularization (TMR), the open-chest version of the procedure approved by the Food and Drug Administration.