translation

(redirected from translatory)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia.
Related to translatory: translatory movement

translation

 [trans-la´shun]
the synthesis of a polypeptide using messenger RNA as a template, a complex process involving ribosomes and transfer RNAs; every three bases (a codon) along the mRNA beginning with the start codon specifies one amino acid in the polypeptide chain.

trans·la·tion

(trans-lā'shŭn),
1. A change or conversion into another form.
2. The complex process by which messenger RNA, transfer RNA, and ribosomes effect the production of protein from amino acids, the specificity of synthesis being controlled by the base sequences of the messenger RNA.
3. In dentistry, the movement of a tooth through alveolar bone without change in axial inclination.
[L. translatio, a transferring, fr. transfero pp. -latus, to carry across]

translation

(trăns-lā′shən, trănz-)
n.
Biology The process by which messenger RNA directs the amino acid sequence of a growing polypeptide during protein synthesis.

trans′la·to′ry (-lə-tôr′ē) adj.

translation

Informatics
A work worded in another language.
 
Molecular biology
The process whereby the genetic information on mRNA is “decoded” and converted into a coherent protein; tRNA converges on ribosomes packaged as rRNA and, at the behest of mRNA, dispenses amino acids to a growing polypeptide chain; protein synthesis is divided into initiation, elongation and termination steps, and the assembly of amino acids into polypeptides using the genetic information encoded in mRNA. The mRNA is “read” from the 5’ end to the 3’ end, with the protein being synthesised from the amino terminus to the carboxyl terminus.
 
Vox populi
The conversion of one language to another. Local health and social service may facilitate the provision of interpreting and translating services.

trans·la·tion

(trans-lā'shŭn)
1. A change or conversion into another form.
2. The process by which messenger RNA, transfer RNA, and ribosomes effect the production of protein from amino acids.
3. dentistry The movement of a tooth through alveolar bone without change in axial inclination.

translation

1. A final stage in the expression of a gene; the lining up of amino acids and synthesis of a polypeptide on a ribosome by means of transfer RNA. Translation requires several enzymes.
2. In a clinical context, the successful application of a new research discovery to a therapeutic modality.
Translationclick for a larger image
Fig. 303 Translation . A polypeptide chain, formed by amino acids joined by peptide bonds.

translation

the formation of a POLYPEPTIDE CHAIN on a RIBOSOME during PROTEIN SYNTHESIS, using a sequence that is contained in MESSENGER RNA.

The process can be divided into a number of steps:

  1. (a) mRNA produced from the DNA during TRANSCRIPTION becomes attached to one or more ribosomes (see POLYRIBOSOME).
  2. (b) the RNA passes through the ribosome, beginning with a start (initiation) signal (generally AUG) near the 5′ end of RNA and ending with a stop signal near the 3′ end (see POLYNUCLEOTIDE CHAIN).
  3. (c) surrounding the ribosomes are various TRANSFER RNA molecules each attached to its specific AMINO ACID. As a triplet of RNA bases moves through the ribosome it is ‘read’ by the correct tRNA molecule which brings the correct amino acid. In bacteria, initiator tRNA is involved in initiating translation following an interaction between 16S rRNA of the small ribosome subunit and the SHINE-DALGARNO sequence on mRNA.
  4. (d) the amino acids become joined by PEPTIDE BONDS, forming a polypeptide chain. Termination occurs when the ribosome encounters a stop codon (UAA, UAG, UGA). See Fig. 303 . See GENETIC CODE for details of the amino acid sequence of the polypeptide chain.

trans·la·tion

(trans-lā'shŭn)
In dentistry, movement of a tooth through alveolar bone without change in axial inclination.
References in periodicals archive ?
This double significance of Chillingworth's English epithet clearly presents a formidable challenge to straightforward Persian rendition; however, when confronted by "The Leech" as Hawthorne's title for his ninth chapter (1:118), Daneshvar finds it possible to offer a simple solution to this translatory problem, substituting the following: "[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]" ("The Owl").
The result of this translatory option is an unequivocal judgement on the state of the pebble.
For the purpose of implementing the landing strategy, translatory motion of the camera is restricted to the forward (x) and downward (-z) directions.
The linear (translatory) motion arises from the tendency to reduce linear irregularity, while the rotational motion is induced by the tendency to reduce orientational irregularity.
In this "sliding of the voice back and forth across this threshold" Lamont finds an "ongoing translatory dynamic" which he compares to Kristeva's thetic phase, a phase which lies between the semiotic and symbolic.
There is no reference to the Latin poetry in the 'Dictionary': here, in an important area of Herbert studies too often ignored, Ray's thorough, translatory approach would have been really useful.
If the disc is displaced, normal opening and closing of the mouth can result in an unusual translatory movement between the condyle and the disc, which is felt as click or pop (figure 3).[24] Disc displacements that result in joint sounds may or may not be painful.
In 1857 Rudolf Clausius presented the first fully fiedged kinetic theory of gases, which assumed that gases consist of small particles in motion.(12) A fundamental aspect of his theory was a theorem of equipartition: he postulated that the total amount of energy of translatory motion of the particles was uniformly distributed over the three directions of translation.
Lai and Mockros [11] calculated the flow field which is generated by a spheroid executing axial translatory oscillations in an infinite, incompressible, viscous fluid.
The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a diarthrodial atypical synovial joint that is capable of both rotational and translatory movements.
Existing guides were originally designed for translatory main motion velocities up to 25 m/min.