translate

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translate

(trăns′lāt′, trănz′-, trăns-lāt′, trănz-)
v. trans·lated, trans·lating, trans·lates
v.tr.
Biology To subject (messenger RNA) to translation.

trans·lat′a·bil′i·ty n.
trans·lat′a·ble adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
Now that we have discussed the translatability of El and Baal in ancient Israel, we need to address the issue of the translatability of Allah in contemporary Indonesia.
The appropriation and commercialisation of this artistic action's poetic-political discourse illustrates how the hermeneutics of the transit-translation process encompass not only translatability and misunderstanding, but also the intentional abuse at reception level, even more so when we see it was taken by a certain P.
(23.) Karlheinz Stierle, "Translatio Studii and Renaissance: From Vertical to Horizontal Translation," in The Translatability of Cultures: Figurations of the Space Between, ed.
Writing transpacific literature therefore requires the intensive labor of visible translation; the notion of untraceable, universal translatability has no place here.
The expression of diabetic complications in ZDSD rats may strengthen the model's translatability. The authors believe that, in addition to the scientific merits of the ZDSD, the use of the ZDSD in the "one rat, many models" paradigm presents an opportunity for investigators to significantly reduce costs while evaluating compound effects on the multiple components of T2D and its sequelae.
"Translatability of Memory in an Age of Globalization." Comparative Literature Studies 41.1 (2004): 101-15.
4) [T]he reason for their paradigmatic accessibility to others and their translatability into other terms is that they are not "religious" or "ritual" activities at bottom.
Thus, I will draw on Martin Sokefeld's essay "Debating Self, Identity, and Culture in Anthropology" (1999), in which he argues that "[b]esides any culture-specific attributes, the self is endowed with reflexivity and agency" (417) and on the concepts of "positive" and "negative feedbacks" existent in Wolfgang Iser's cybernetic model of cultural translatability (passim).
Therefore, in this paper I explore how France's 2011 veil ban may be viewed as Orientalism, spurring a unique form of sexist Islamophobia, which complicates the translatability of Western feminism.
What is more, translators' aesthetic preferences for what constitutes "good" literature in combination with the concerns about translatability and marketability to an English-speaking audience were also important factors in the translation business, as Cohn elucidates in her discussion of Harriet de Onis and Alfred A.
Each of these model systems presents limitations in functionality, reproducibility, translatability and availability.
This quote encapsulates two important features of Ndalianis's book: its emphasis on the translatability of sensation from media to viewer and the primacy granted to personal perspective.