transillumination


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trans·il·lu·mi·na·tion

(trans'i-lū'mi-nā'shŭn),
Method of examination by the passage of light through tissues or a body cavity.
[trans- + L. illumino, pp. -atus, to light up]

transillumination

/trans·il·lu·mi·na·tion/ (trans″ĭ-loo″mĭ-na´shun) the passage of strong light through a body structure, to permit inspection by an observer on the opposite side.

transillumination

(trăns′ĭ-lo͞o′mə-nā′shən, trănz′-)
n.
The passing of a light through the walls of a body part or organ to facilitate medical inspection.

trans′il·lu′mi·nate′ (-lo͞o′mə-nāt′) v.
trans′il·lu′mi·na′tor n.

transillumination

[-ilo̅o̅′minā′shən]
Etymology: L, trans, through, illuminare, to light up
1 the passage of light through a solid or liquid substance.
2 the passage of light through body tissues for the purpose of examining a structure interposed between the observer and the light source. A diaphanoscope is an instrument introduced into a body cavity to transilluminate tissues.

transillumination

Clinical practice The shining of a light through a tissue or body region to detect masses or other lesions

trans·il·lu·mi·na·tion

(tranz'i-lū'mi-nā'shŭn)
Passage of light through a solid or liquid substance for diagnostic examination.
[trans- + L. illumino, pp. -atus, to light up]

transillumination

A method of examination in which a bright light is shone through tissue to try to determine whether it contains abnormal structures such as a solid tumour.

Transillumination

A technique of checking for tooth decay by shining a light behind the patient's teeth. Decayed areas show up as spots or shadows.
Mentioned in: Tooth Decay

transillumination 

1. The shining of light through a translucent membrane. This is principally used to better visualize ocular tumours, cysts or haemorrhages within the eye. It is accomplished by directing a narrow intense beam of light on the side of the eye. Example: If a tumour is present in the eye some light will not be reflected and the pupil will appear partially or completely black, instead of bright red as when the healthy eye is thus illuminated. Syn. transcleral illumination.
2. See retro- illumination.

trans·il·lu·mi·na·tion

(tranz'i-lū'mi-nā'shŭn)
Method of examination by passage of light through tissues or a body cavity.
[trans- + L. illumino, pp. -atus, to light up]

transillumination (tran´siloo´minā´shən),

n 1. examination of an organ, cavity, or tissue (e.g., tooth or gingival tissue) by transmitted light. A valuable aid in detecting carious lesions, disclosing carious or demineralized dentin during cavity preparation, checking the finish or gingival margins of restorations, and revealing cement, debris, or calculus subgingivally.
2. a test in which the use of transmitted light may disclose a discoloration of the coronal aspect, indicating dentinal tubular hemorrhage as a result of trauma, pulpal necrosis, or fracture.
3. examination of tissues by means of a light placed so that the region under study is between the light source and the observer.

transillumination

the passage of strong light through a body structure, to permit inspection by an observer on the opposite side.

ocular transillumination
intense light placed on the sclera behind the ciliary body is transmitted to the interior of the eye, producing a tapetal reflex. Useful in identifying the presence of intraocular masses and demonstrating atrophy of the iris.
References in periodicals archive ?
During the second half of the twentieth century, newer and more advanced radiologic techniques such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging diminished the role for transillumination in the diagnosis of sinus disease.
7%) and transillumination defects (Figure 2) were present in 10 eyes (14.
Products obtained by restriction enzyme digestion were separated electrophoretically on a 2 % agarose gel, stained with ethidium bromide and visualized by UV transillumination.
Seroma presented as swelling and discomfort related to a postoperative accumulation of fluid at the vasectomy site, as demonstrated by transillumination and no stigmata of infection.
However, in case of infection or intracystic haemorrhage, transillumination was negative.
It should allow the use of safe blue-light transillumination without the risks of
Similar devices that are mainly based on optical phenomena like digital imaging fiber-optic transillumination (DIFOTI) and red laser-light induced fluorescence also considered as more accurate methods than direct visual examination.
Amplified DNA is visualized by ultraviolet transillumination.
Second, the DK transillumination instrument emits an intense, focused beam of light to help visualize crown fractures and caries.