transient ischaemic attack


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Related to transient ischaemic attack: transient ischemic attack, stroke

transient ischaemic attack

; TIA sudden interruption in arterial blood flow to brain (lasting only seconds/moments) causing temporary loss of consciousness; normally followed by complete recovery; an important marker of cerebrovascular disease, with risk of stroke (cerebrovascular accident)
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Detailed information on drugs classes used in the treatment of patients with Ischaemic Stroke, Haemorrhagic Stroke and Transient Ischaemic Attack (TIA), together with population-based drug prescribing profiles.
Transient ischaemic attacks are caused by a temporary interruption of the blood flow to brain cells.
A third kind of stroke is a transient ischaemic attack (TIA) - a short- term stroke that lasts for less than 24 hours.
It sounds as if your father had a transient ischaemic attack (TIA) - a minor stroke that resolves itiself completely within 24 hours.
A THE most likely cause for your symptom is a transient ischaemic attack, a medical term given to a small clot obstructing the blood supply to part of the brain for a few minutes before spontaneously disappearing.
The ROCKET AF study confirmed that once-daily rivaroxaban is highly effective in preventing stroke in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation, with and without previous stroke or transient ischaemic attack, so we believe there is potential for rivaroxaban to provide this same protective benefit to patients with a recent ESUS," said Dr Luis Felipe Graterol, Medical Director, Bayer HealthCare UK.
This service is to provide information, advice and support to individuals diagnosed with a stroke or transient ischaemic attack, as well as their family and carers.
The Stroke Association said 74% of people would not go to A&E if they experienced symptoms of a transient ischaemic attack (TIA).
A transient ischaemic attack (TIA), often called a mini-stroke, happens when the brain's blood supply is interrupted for a brief time.
Those with chronic neurological disease, chronic liver disease or those who have suffered a stroke or a transient ischaemic attack (TIA) and people who have had a problem with their spleen, for example sickle cell disease, or have had their spleen removed.
Patients entered the SPARCL trial with a history of stroke or transient ischaemic attack within the previous 6 months, only mildly elevated cholesterol levels and no history of heart disease.

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