transgenerational

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transgenerational

(tranz″jĕn-ĕ-rā′shŏn-ăl) [ trans- + generational]
Having an effect on several generations of a family.
transgenerationally (′shŏn-ă-lē)
References in periodicals archive ?
To transform authentic movement into a springtime symbol and a mode of communicating inter-racial understanding, using the ancient African-Egyptian legend of the Maypole dance which represents renewed life and fertility both transgenerationally and cross-culturally.
Strikingly, inter-individual differences in stress responses are transgenerationally transmitted.
We, both personally and transgenerationally, both particularly and anonymously, share the boon and burden of being the condition of each other's possibilities.
viii) Moreover, because of low levels of outmigration, the marginality of camp populations is reproduced transgenerationally.
Or, in light of Marianne Thornton's dispossession, was the condition in fact transmitted to Forster transgenerationally in the form of a dark family inheritance of loss, what Abraham and Torok would call a "crypt"?
Children preserve the parents' "mental state", and this is the reason why transgenerationally transmitted patterns are generationally continued.
The toxin induces the appearance of new imprinted-like genes that transgenerationally transmit this altered epigenome to promote new phenotypes.
Additionally there are mechanisms for passing information transgenerationally other than through genes.
In reality, the Mexican immigrant experience largely duplicates, transgenerationally, the experience of previous immigrant groups: the immigrants themselves usually have a poor command of English; their children operate mostly in English; their grandchildren often know no or little Spanish (Rumbaut, Massey, and Bean 2006).
If Rubenfeld's theory of the transgenerationally adopted Constitution were right, then it would make no sense to speak of a particular time at which a Constitution is adopted.
A growing body of evidence exists in animals, plants, and humans that epigenetic effects induced by many types of stimuli and interventions-including nutrition, endocrine disrupting chemicals, maternal care, and maternal stress-can be inherited transgenerationally and affect subsequent generations.