transgenerational

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transgenerational

(tranz″jĕn-ĕ-rā′shŏn-ăl) [ trans- + generational]
Having an effect on several generations of a family.
transgenerationally (′shŏn-ă-lē)
References in periodicals archive ?
Strikingly, inter-individual differences in stress responses are transgenerationally transmitted.
We, both personally and transgenerationally, both particularly and anonymously, share the boon and burden of being the condition of each other's possibilities.
Or, in light of Marianne Thornton's dispossession, was the condition in fact transmitted to Forster transgenerationally in the form of a dark family inheritance of loss, what Abraham and Torok would call a "crypt"?
Africology is the best word to describe an Afrocentric study of African phenomena transgenerationally and transcontinentally.
This group of targeted genes may hold clues to how DEHP acts transgenerationally.
3] It appears the nutrition status of fathers can be passed down transgenerationally and affect the health of generations to come.
Garratt's claim that the trauma novel offers the possibility that 'traumatic experience itself can be passed down from one generation to another' hints at the psychoanalytic concept of transgenerationally transmitted trauma, a subject that has enjoyed much literary and critical attention over the last number of years.
Additionally there are mechanisms for passing information transgenerationally other than through genes.
In reality, the Mexican immigrant experience largely duplicates, transgenerationally, the experience of previous immigrant groups: the immigrants themselves usually have a poor command of English; their children operate mostly in English; their grandchildren often know no or little Spanish (Rumbaut, Massey, and Bean 2006).
If Rubenfeld's theory of the transgenerationally adopted Constitution were right, then it would make no sense to speak of a particular time at which a Constitution is adopted.
A growing body of evidence exists in animals, plants, and humans that epigenetic effects induced by many types of stimuli and interventions-including nutrition, endocrine disrupting chemicals, maternal care, and maternal stress-can be inherited transgenerationally and affect subsequent generations.
Consider how such trauma can be transmitted transgenerationally, not only through the teaching and speech of their parents and neighbors, but through interaction with people ineluctably altered by their trauma.