transgenerational

transgenerational

(tranz″jĕn-ĕ-rā′shŏn-ăl) [ trans- + generational]
Having an effect on several generations of a family.
transgenerationally (′shŏn-ă-lē)
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
This volume contains 25 articles related to various areas of genetics, such as transgenerational epigenetic inheritance, mechanisms of neural crest migration, the Hippo signaling network and its biological functions, the Smc5/6 complex, H4-H4 histone chaperone pathways, piRNA-guided genomic defense, metabolic gene clusters in eukaryotes, genetic control of early cell lineages in the mammalian embryo, and single-cell RNA-sequencing strategies to dissect complex tissues.
Executives at Praedicat, describing chemicals that may cause harm to familial descendants of exposed users for generations, also assess the (https://www.carriermanagement.com/features/2019/07/08/194973.htm) potential for such transgenerational harms to impact the tails of liability insurance lines.
When these modifications are made in germ cells, they can be passed down to future generations in a phenomenon is known as transgenerational epigenetic inheritance.
He will discuss questions such as: how can we help build cultural resilience, tackle inequality and stop the transgenerational transmission of trauma?
In partnership with Singapore's Business Families Institute (BFI), Investcorp is now facilitating a reciprocal Arabian Gulf tour for Asian investors of Bahrain, Abu Dhabi and Dubai, enabling participants to learn from some of the most successful transgenerational business families, meet with key economic policy makers and network with Bahrain's growing start-up community.
Referring to Nicolas Abraham's theory of the transgenerational phantom, I position Pharos within its geographical and historical context to demonstrate that the island setting is a site where the exploration of personal, psychological elements of memory within a transgenerational context enable the interrogation of fractures within Scottish history.
Muller had indeed made a momentous breakthrough in late 1926 when he found a way to produce quickly copious transgenerational phenotypic changes (e.g., alterations in size, color, or shape) in fruit flies, which he interpreted as being the result of gene mutation.
In the atrazine lineage, F1 generation were the offspring of the injected rats (FO); F2 came from the egg/sperm of the rats exposed in utero (grandchildren); and F3 were considered transgenerational (great-grandchildren), as they had no direct germline (egg or sperm cells) exposure to atrazine.
In establishing a critical terrain for alternative visions and politics of transnational and transgenerational reproductive justice, we find Fu-jen Chen's call for radicalizing adoption discourse apt:
Ecologists and evolutionary biologists at the University of East Anglia in Norwich, England, found that heat stress appears to be associated with transgenerational fertility problems.
The transgenerational burden needs to be lightened for Lebanon to move forward.