transfusion guidelines


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transfusion guidelines

Transfusion medicine Guidlelines for use of blood components, which are usually written in a hospital's policy manual. See Transfusion criteria, Transfusion medicine.
Transfusion guidelines, general criteria
Hemoglobin
 < 8g/dL if healthy and stable
 < 11g/dL if Pt is at risk of ischemia
Acute blood loss ≥ 15% (est) blood volume, tachycardia, oliguria
Symptomatic anemia resulting in tachycardia, change in mental status, cardiac ischemia, or SOB Transfusion 1996; 36:144. See Transfusion guidelines.
Packed RBCs  
•  Hemorrhage
•  Active Physiologic instability, including tachycardia, ↓ in systolic BP > 30 mm Hg below baseline, orthostatic hypotension, angina, mental confusion, agitation
•  Chronic Physiologic instability–see above, refractory state.
•  Sickle cell anemia
Refractory crisis, acute lung syndrome, CVA, priapism, hepatic infarct, acute papillary necrosis, general anesthesia, contrast studies
Platelets  
• Platelet count < 30,000/µL
•  Functional platelet deficit
•  Surgical prophylaxis
•  Massive bleeding
Cryoprecipitate  
•  Active bleeding, fibrinogen < 100 mg/dL
•  Massive bleeding
•  DIC w/ bleeding
•  10 fibrinolysis
Dysfibrinogenemia
Majorin fibrinogen, factor VIII, von Willebrand factor
± in reversible liver disease
Queens Hospital Medical Center, 1990
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to the transfusion guidelines (2000) issued by the China's Ministry of Health, when Hb >10 g/dl, RBC transfusion was not needed; while when Hb <7 g/dl, transfusion should be considered; when Hb between 1-9 g/dl, the RBC transfusion should be considered according to patients' cardiopulmonary compensatory function, body metabolism, and oxygen consumption.
Different blood transfusion guidelines are introduced in various parts of the world, to specific transfusion of Hb for patients with different levels.
The need for RBC transfusions in LBW infants had decreased a lot over the past two decades due to reduction in phlebotomy blood losses, adoption of more restrictive transfusion guidelines and to a lesser extent, the use of recombinant erythropoietin (EPO).
RBC transfusions in very and extremely low birth weight infants under restrictive transfusion guidelines: is exogenous EPO necessary?
Transfusion guidelines have been available for decades, and both laboratory (1) and hospital accreditation standards (2-4) require or recommend monitoring of transfusion practice according to the institution's defined transfusion criteria.
Well-accepted plasma transfusion guidelines come from multiple sources, including the College of American Pathologists (CAP) and AABB (formerly American Association of Blood Banks).
By developing and implementing comprehensive blood management programmes focusing on implementation of evidence-based transfusion guidelines to reduce variability in transfusion practice in hospitals can promote safe and clinically effective blood utilisation.
Participants reported their sources for transfusion guidelines as follows (multiple answers permitted): journal article(s), 70% (n = 88); professional organization, 63% (n = 79); textbook(s), 62% (n = 78); local expert opinion, 45% (n = 57); local blood donor center, 18% (n = 22); centralized requirements of a health care system, 14% (n = 17); and unknown, 6% (n = 8).
Thirty-five percent of participating facilities required compliance with transfusion guidelines for physician practice privileges.
The effects of a selfeducating blood component request form and enforcements of transfusion guidelines on FFP and platelet usage.