transfix


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transfix

 [trans-fiks´]
to pierce through or impale.

trans·fix

(trans'fiks),
To pierce with a sharp instrument.
[L. trans-figo, pp. -fixus, to pierce through, fr. figo, to fasten]

transfix

(trăns-fĭks′) [″ + figere, to fix]
To pierce through or impale with a sharp instrument.
References in periodicals archive ?
McElroy said that factoring payments was one more way that Transfix could continue its journey from a digital freight marketplace to a true platform company that quickly spins up value-adding services for both sides of the market, shipper and carrier.
The way that Transfix.it solves this problem is by first translating text by using software, and then letting the users of the site fix the errors that the software makes.
Cricket Communications Inc, a provider of wireless services and a wholly-owned subsidiary of Leap Wireless International Inc (Nasdaq:LEAP), and Samsung Telecommunications America (Samsung Mobile), a major mobile phone provider in the US, on Tuesday announced the launch of the smartphone, the Samsung Transfix (SCH-R730).
Prior to joining New York City-based Transfix about two years ago, Shen spent nearly 20 years in Silicon Valley.
(3,4) According to these guidelines, fixation with screws alone is generally sufficient to transfix or support Schatzker Type 3 (5) (AO/ASIF type B2.26) fractures to prevent collapse.
For half a century, Brakhage has made movies that alienate some audiences, transfix others, and leave others wobbling from one state to the other.
But the managing director of translation services firm Transfix, who has been living in New Zealand for the past five years, chose to return to her home of Huddersfield to get the business under way.
Ross is able to tantalise and transfix an audience with seemingly little prepared material.
Here's Simon, as Tommy Cockles, summing up David Berglas: "He looked like the sort of man who might transfix your wife on a package holiday in a Romanian bar.
His self-proclaimed Minimalist "failure" is most poignant in the case of Fred Sandback: "[He] can transfix and subjugate me with a length of twine strung across a corner of a room, but I have not found a way to write about the experience." A lesser critic would respond to Sandback's twine with a string of words, preferably including some fashionable allusion to theory, but Sylvester's responsive, experiential criticism is committed to letting the object lead.