transferrin saturation


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transferrin saturation

percentage of iron binding by the major plasma iron transport protein, measured in the blood to detect iron excess or deficiency. The normal transferrin saturation capacity in serum is 20% to 55%. See also total iron.

trans·fer·rin sat·ur·a·tion

(trans-fer'in sach'ŭr-ā'shŭn)
A calculation, expressed in percentages, of the amount of transferrin that is bound to iron. Determined by measuring serum iron and total iron-binding capacity (TIBC): serum iron × 100 = percentage saturation TIBC; helpful in differentiating anemias: a low transferrin saturation is associated with iron deficiency states; high with excess iron.
References in periodicals archive ?
We found that the sensitivity of the CHr was not superior to the MCH parameter or the transferrin saturation, which is similar to the results of two other studies performed in hospital patients in which the authors also concluded that the CHr does not perform better than standard tests for IDA.
Transferrin saturation and serum ferritin arethe preferential indicators for estimation of iron status.
This is believed to occur when the transferrin saturation exceeds a critical threshold and free iron is available for bacteria to use (Maynor & Brophy, 2007).
Comparison of the serum ferritin and percentage of transferrin saturation as exposure markers of iron-driven oxidative stress-related disease outcomes.
Fasting serum transferrin saturation and serum ferritin concentration are recommended as initial tests for HH (11) (SOR C).
It also should not be forgotten that in HH, serum iron levels and the transferrin saturation rate can be within normal limits in cases with an excessive accumulation of iron in reticuloendothelial system organs and higher ferritin levels.
Relationships of serum ferritin, transferrin saturation, and HDE mutations and self-reported diabetes in the Hemochromatosis and Iron Overlaod Screening (HEIRS) study.
Women with iron deficiency exhibited significantly lower levels of hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume, ferritin, and transferrin saturation in comparison with women who did not have iron deficiency anemia (Table 1).
All patients had a transferrin saturation [greater than or equal to] 45 %, with 22.
Laboratory analysis revealed low serum iron (17 mg/dL), high serum ferritin (1343 [micro] g/mL), low serum transferrin saturation (6%), undetectable serum ceruloplasmin (<4.
I'm using what's clinically readily available, assessing total iron binding capacity and transferrin saturation.
4 g/l) levels and transferrin saturation (4%), and a markedly elevated serum ferritin level (1 579 [micro]g/l).