transfer

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transfer

 [trans´fer]
1. the taking or moving of something from one place to another.
2. the moving of a patient from one surface to another. Patients can be taught to transfer safely either independently or with minimal assistance if they can balance in a sitting position.
gamete intrafallopian transfer (GIFT) a type of assisted reproductive technology consisting of retrieval of oocytes from the ovary, followed by placement of oocytes and sperm in the fallopian tubes by laparoscopy.
Gamete intrafallopian transfer (GIFT). Multiple ova and washed sperm are injected into the fallopian tube, where fertilization may occur. From McKinney et al., 2000.
passive transfer the conferring of immunity to a nonimmune host by injection of antibody or lymphocytes from an immune or sensitized donor.
sliding board transfer a method of transferring a patient: a smooth tapered board is placed under the patient and stabilized on the surface to which movement will take place so that the patient can glide across.
tendon transfer surgical relocation of the insertion of a tendon of a normal muscle to another site to take over the function of another muscle inactivated by trauma or disease.
tubal embryo transfer (TET)
1. a method of assisted reproductive technology consisting of retrieval of oocytes from the ovary, followed by their fertilization and culture in the laboratory with placement of the resulting embryos in the fallopian tubes by laparoscopy more than 24 hours after the original retrieval.
2. laparoscopic transfer of cryopreserved embryos to the fallopian tubes.
zygote intrafallopian transfer (ZIFT) a type of assisted reproductive technology consisting of retrieval of oocytes from the ovary, followed by their fertilization and culture in the laboratory and the placement of the resulting zygotes in the fallopian tubes by laparoscopy 24 hours after the original retrieval.

trans·fer

(trans'fĕr),
1. Process of removal or transferral.
2. A condition in which learning in one situation influences learning in another situation; a carry-over of learning that may be positive in effect, as when learning one behavior facilitates the learning of something else, or may be negative, as when one habit interferes with the acquisition of a later one.
Synonym(s): transmission (1)
[L. trans-fero, to bear across]

transfer

Medspeak
noun
(1) A popular term for a patient whose care has been passed from one service to another.
(2) The changing of a thing’s position in relationship to others.

verb To pass the care of a patient from one service or ward to another.
 
Medspeak-UK
When the care of an individual is passed from one professional to another and/or one agency to another and/or one location to another.
 
Psychiatry
noun A neurologic equivalent applied to a time, place, or situation other than the way in which the equivalent was initially learned.
 
Reproduction medicine
noun The moving of a fertilised egg or more advanced reproductive product from one environment to another which is more suitable for long-term survival.

transfer

Medtalk noun
1. A popular term for a Pt whose care has been passed from one service to another.
2. The changing of a thing's position with relationship to others. See Blastocyst transfer, Egg transfer, Electron transfer, Electronic funds transfer, Embryo transfer, Gamete intrafallopian transfer, Gene transfer, Linear transfer, Microvascular free toe transfer, Somatic-cell nuclear transfer, Zygote intrafallopian transfer verbTo pass the care of a Pt from one service or ward to another.

trans·fer

(trans'fĕr)
1. Process of removal or change of place.
2. A condition in which learning in one situation influences learning in another situation; a carryover of learning that may be positive in effect, as when learning one behavior facilitates the learning of something else, or may be negative, as when one habit interferes with the acquisition of a later one.
Synonym(s): transmission (1) .
3. In physical therapy, movement of a patient from one surface (e.g., bed, chair) to another.
[L. trans-fero, to bear across]

Patient discussion about transfer

Q. can hepatitis be transferred from fathers sperm when concieving a child? My partner has hepatitis C and he has gotten me pregnant will our baby have it too?

A. Here is taken from wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hepatitis_C#Transmission) :

Sexual transmission of HCV is considered to be rare. Studies show the risk of sexual transmission in heterosexual, monogamous relationships is extremely rare or even null. The CDC does not recommend the use of condoms between long-term monogamous discordant couples (where one partner is positive and the other is negative). However, because of the high prevalence of hepatitis C, this small risk may translate into a non-trivial number of cases transmitted by sexual routes. Vaginal penetrative sex is believed to have a lower risk of transmission than sexual practices that involve higher levels of trauma to anogenital mucosa.

Mother-to-child transmission of hepatitis C has been well described, but occurs relatively infrequently. Transmission occurs only among women who are HCV RNA positive at the time of delivery; the risk of transmission in this setting is approximately 6 out of 100. Among women w

More discussions about transfer
References in periodicals archive ?
transferor recognizes only a portion of the remaining built-in gain and the gain-deferral method continues to apply to the remainder; and fully taxable dispositions of a portion of an interest in a Sec.
[section]20.7520-3(b)(3)(iii) states that the mortality tables cannot be used to determine the income interest of a life tenant who dies in a common accident with the transferor of such interest.
* The transferor was able to repurchase them on substantially the agreed terms.
However, with respect to transfers before 1998, such a transfer was not a direct skip if the transfer was to a grandchild of the transferor or of the transferor's spouse or former spouse, and the grandchild's parent who was the lineal descendant of the transferor or his spouse or former spouse was dead at the time of the transfer.
But if ownership of the collection is split between the entity and the transferor, agents and brokers can encourage clients to consider separate policies.
For federal estate tax purposes, where the annuity ceases at the death of the transferor, the value of the property sold to the transferee-obligor in return for his promise to pay the annuity is excludable from the annuitant-transferor's estate.
Its permitted activities (1) are significantly limited, (2) were entirely specified in the legal documents that established the SPE or created the beneficial interests in the transferred assets that it holds, and (3) may be significantly changed only with the approval of the holders of at least a majority of the beneficial interests held by entities other than the transferor.
Creditors also have less difficulty suing and recovering from the transferor. And if the bulk transfer is a fraudulent conveyance, the transferor's creditors have a remedy under state law and the Bankruptcy Code.
For example, if a transferee lessor acquires property subject to a section 467 rental agreement at other than the beginning or end of a rental period, and the transferee lessor's beginning section 467 loan balance differs from the transferor lessor's section 467 loan balance immediately before the transfer, the rental period that includes the day of the transfer must be bifurcated into two rental periods, one beginning before the transfer and one beginning after.(96)
(3) A transferred financial asset should be considered pledged as collateral to secure an obligation of the transferor (i.e., not de-recognized) if the transferor has not surrendered control of the financial asset.
Instead, they must form a new LLC, then transfer the assets of the existing ownership to the new entity, by deed (or if the transferor is a corporation or other entity, the transfer also can be accomplished by merger).
FASB 77 defines recourse as the right of a transferee of assets to receive payment from the transferor for the "failure of the debtors to pay when due, effects of prepayments, or adjustments resulting from defects in the eligibility of the transferred receivables." This standard establishes the following criteria that, is satisfied, permit a transfer of receivables with recourse to be considered a sale of the assets rather than a financing transaction: