transferase


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Related to transferase: Glucuronyl transferase, Alanine transferase, Peptidyl transferase, Terminal transferase

transferase

 [trans´fer-ās]
an enzyme that catalyzes the transfer, from one molecule to another, of a chemical group that does not exist in free state during the transfer.

transferase

/trans·fer·ase/ (trans´fer-ās) a class of enzymes that transfer a chemical group from one compound to another.

transferase

(trăns′fə-rās′, -rāz′)
n.
Any of various enzymes that catalyze the transfer of a chemical group, such as a phosphate or amine, from one molecule to another.

transferase

[trans′fərās]
Etymology: L, transferre + Fr, diastase, enzyme
any of a group of enzymes that catalyzes the transfer of a chemical group or radical, such as the phosphate, methyl, amine, or keto groups, from one molecule to another.

transferase

Any enzyme that catalyses the movement of atoms or groups of atoms from one molecule to another. A kinase adds a phosphate group to a substrate such as an amino acid.

transferase

any enzyme that catalyses the transfer of a chemical group such as amino, methyl or alkyl from one SUBSTRATE to another substrate.

transferase (trans´fərās´),

n a group of enzymes that catalyze the transfer of a chemical group or radical from one molecule to another.

transferase

an enzyme that catalyzes the transfer, from one molecule to another, of a chemical group that does not exist in free state during the transfer.

gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT)
found in the cell membrane in most tissues, but particularly high levels are present in liver (bile duct cells, hepatocytes) and kidney (renal convoluted tubular cells). Increased serum levels occur primarily with cholestasis.
glucuronyl transferase
enzyme which converts bilirubin to a soluble glucuronide.
glutathione S-t's
widely distributed enzymes catalyzing the detoxification of many compounds but particularly xenobiotics by linkage of the cysteine moiety of glutathione with the compound.
ornithine carbamoyl transferase (OCT)
catalyzes the transfer of carbamoyl, as from carbamoylphosphate to l-ornithine to form orthophosphate and citrulline in the synthesis of urea. Found almost exclusively in the liver. Determination of serum levels is used as an indicator of hepatocellular damage, particularly in cattle, sheep and pigs.
peptidyl transferase
a ribosomal enzyme that transfers the growing peptide from its carrier tRNA to the α-amino group of the amino acid residue of the aminoacyl-tRNA specified by the next codon of the mRNA.
References in periodicals archive ?
Glutathione transferase isozymes of diamondback moth larvae and their role in the degradation of some organophosphorus insecticides.
Glutathione Transferase P Plays a Critical Role in the Development of Lung Carcinogenesis following Exposure to Tobacco-Related Carcinogens and Urethane.
Glutathione transferase zeta-catalyzed bioactivation of dichloroacetic acid: reaction of glyoxylate with amino acid nucleophiles.
Katsuya H, Misumi M, Ohtani Y, Miike T Postanesthetic acute renal failure due to carnitine palmityl transferase deficiency.
Sites of interaction of streptogramin A and B antibiotics in the peptidyl transferase loop of 23S rRNA and the synergism of their inhibitory mechanisms.
Hepatocellular integrity in liver donors and recipients indicated by glutathione transferase a.
When they introduced a fructosyl transferase gene into the sugar beet, their theories were confirmed.
Serum alanine transferase (ALT) level was 750 U/L, serum aspartate transferase (AST) 445 U/L, serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) 395 U/L, serum [gamma]-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) 289 U/L and total bilirubin concentration was 3.
Hence, the present work is carried out to determine the effect of fluoride intoxication on amino transferase enzyme activity in fresh water cat fish, Clarias batrachus.
The ineffectiveness of mean corpuscular volume, or MCV; gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT); and other liverenzyme tests in screening for excessive alcohol consumption in medical patients has been recognized for many years, despite the wide use of these tests in medical practice.
An obvious target for genetic engineering is the rubber transferase enzyme, the biological catalyst that polymerizes natural rubber from isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP), an allylic pyrophosphate (usually farnesyl pyrophosphate, FPP, in vivo) being required to initiate the reaction.